Megadrive

TV review by
Kari Croop, Common Sense Media
Megadrive TV Poster Image
Stunt comedian revels in lame jokes, reckless driving.

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show highlights some pretty cool machines, but overall the purpose seems to be highlighting Johnny's antics. More often than not, segments focus on destruction and recklessness, even though a disclaimer that runs before each show warns viewers at home not to try what they see.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Johnny's less interested in learning about each machine than he is in making immature jokes -- or subtly making fun of the people he's interviewing. He also brags about failing his driver's test, killing deer with his car, lying to his insurance company, etc.

Violence

Most of the things Johnny does are dangerous. A few segments involve violent explosions and other weaponry, from flaming arrows to bombs.

Sex

Some sexual innuendo, like when Johnny uses a log forwarder to simulate masturbation.

Language

Bleeped swearing (mostly "f--k" and "s--t"), plus audible words like "ass," "hell," "bitch," etc.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this stunt-oriented reality show can tread into some pretty violent territory with explosions, fire, and reckless driving. And although the series runs a disclaimer at the beginning of each episode urging viewers not to try what they see at home, it may indirectly encourage irresponsible behavior. Due to the thrill-seeking, there's also some bleeped language (mostly "f--k" and "s--t"), as well as audible words like "hell," "bitch," "ass," etc., in addition to mild (but occasionally crude) sexual innuendo.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 13 year old Written byMrPopularity January 4, 2011

teens and adults laughing at different times

The kid sure is funny! I think his humor goes over younger viewers heads so it's not an issue for the young ones (under 13) but provides plenty of hilariou... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

In MEGADRIVE, admitted bad driver/comedian Johnny Pemberton gets behind the wheel to test drive some of the most extreme machines on land, air, and sea. Trouble is, he isn't really qualified -- but that doesn't stop him from piloting a stunt plane, a tank, or even a fire-breathing semi. He also talks to the owners of these high-octane machines to find out what makes them tick and how much abuse they can actually take.

Is it any good?

There's no question that this sophomoric hybrid of Top Gear, Trick It Out, and Jackass is directly targeting teenage boys, who will probably be the only ones to laugh when Johnny stuffs a squawking, live chicken into the cockpit of a stunt plane and takes it on its first real "flight." But that's nothing compared with what happens later, when he comes out of a series of aerial barrel rolls and then promptly vomits all over himself. There's even some high-flying vandalism when Johnny toilet papers the sky with about eight rolls of tissue before marveling, "It's like the tears of God ... but you can wipe your ass with them."

So if you're tuning into Megadrive, that's the level of humor you should expect. If you expect more, you should look elsewhere.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the element of danger involved with test-driving these extreme machines. Does the threat of violence and/or bodily injury make you want to watch? Why?

  • Do you think Johnny takes the risks of his job seriously? Does his attitude make what he's doing seem any less dangerous?

  • How real are the stunts you're seeing? Are the owners of these machines taking on unnecessary risk by allowing Johnny to travel in (or operate) their vehicles? Why would they agree to participate? What's in it for them?

TV details

For kids who love reality TV

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