MFF: Mom Friends Forever

TV review by
Joyce Slaton, Common Sense Media
MFF: Mom Friends Forever TV Poster Image
Supportive female friendship is sweet, and aimed at moms.

Parents say

age 17+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 15+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Many positive values are lauded on this sweet and wholesome study of a friendship, including the value of family bonds and how nice it is to be there for others when they need you. Judi's distaste for the husband she's divorcing may make some viewers uncomfortable but Kate's supportive marriage is a nice view of a happy long-term relationship, rare on television.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Judi and Kate are loving, caring moms trying to do the best by their kids and their community. They present a lovely portrait of supportive female friends. They often jokingly disparage their kids as "brats" but the kids are given their own off-camera interviews to explain themselves.

Violence
Sex

Judi is newly single and may be dating; there are some subtle references to sex as when a mom is told "use birth control next time" at her baby shower.

Language

Expect some occasional language, such as when Kate reminds Judi they like to "bitch" about their "brats."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Kate and Judi are enthusiastic drinkers who consider alcohol an essential part of any party or gathering, but we don't see them overindulge onscreen. They do have frequent glasses of wine and cocktails though and there's praise for the restorative power of "a good stiff drink" says Judi.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that MFF: Mom Friends Forever is a sweet reality show about a set of Midwestern mom pals and is not likely to interest kids or teens. The friends of the title are supportive and kindly with each other, if sometimes mildly mocking with their teenage kids and husbands. Both are enthusiastic drinkers, making cocktails and drinking wine and champagne onscreen. We don't see anyone drunk, however, and the drinking comes off as festive, not compulsive. There are some mild references to sex. The two moms frequently disparage their children, calling them brats, selfish, and lazy, but they also love them deeply and are clearly responsible parents.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 11 and 16 year old Written byheathfeath724 January 28, 2013

Relatable Mom show

I love it. Very relatable family situations. I can watch it for hours.
Parent of a 1, 3, 4, 6, 6, and 12 year old Written byResponsibleParentOf9 July 28, 2013

Sad to think this is on Nick Jr.

A reality show...on Nick Jr. MFF is part of the heavily protested "NickMom" block on NICK JR. Sadly, this won't be going away. Don't bother,... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old October 8, 2012

Great show for moms, really not for kids OR teens

Well I have to say that this is a show for moms only. I have seen this on Nick Jr. When I saw this, I was like, "okay,but,my mom can watch this." One... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old November 29, 2012

This shows okay

Okay, I know I'm only 11, but I kinda get a kick out of this show. It's pretty much okay, but with some adult themes.

What's the story?

In MFF: MOM FRIENDS FOREVER, Kate Frisina-White and Judi Diamond are longtime friends in St. Louis who are taking their video blog, Lipstick 'n' Laundry, to the next level with this reality series about their lives and friendship. Both women have two teenaged kids, jobs, and husbands, though Judi's husband is on his way out since the pair are divorcing. On MFF: Mom Friends Forever, Judi and Kate navigate life's ordinary ups and downs, such as a child graduating from high school or throwing a baby shower for a friend. We see them with their families, and then alone, dishing the dirt on said family with each other. Throughout, the women are vociferously close: \"Judi and I are married, in every sense except sex,\" says Kate. Yep, looks that way.

Is it any good?

Portraits of loving female friendships are a bit rare on television, where it's more likely women will fight over men or throw each other into swimming pools rather than dole out hugs when they're needed. Thus to view Kate and Judi's extremely sweet and supportive friendship is an uplifting tonic. "Whatever you need, I'll do and be there," says Judi to Kate when the two are planning a party, unwittingly summing up their friendship. The two women have their problems: Judi is divorcing, Kate's two teenaged boys do nothing around the house and don't appreciate their mom. But Judi and Kate have each other, and they clearly relish hanging out together to decompress.

Younger kids probably won't enjoy MFF: Mom Friends Forever; the action is too mild and talky to hold their attention. And though teens may not be interested in storylines like the throwing of a baby shower, MFF: Mom Friends Forever would be great for them to watch and see a real, functional female friendship, and maybe gain more sympathy for their own moms at the same time. Moms are the ones who will really appreciation MFF: Mom Friends Forever, and will recognize their own friendships in Judi and Kate's: ribald, frank, and utterly sweet.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about whether MFF: Mom Friends Forever is a realistic portrait of a female friendship. Do you have friends like Judi or Kate? Do you do things that are like the things they do? Does their dialogue ring true to you?

  • Is it common on television to see good female friends portrayed? Can you think of any other shows that resolve around best friends? How are they like Judi and Kate? How are they different?

  • What audience do you think Nick Jr. is trying to reach with MFF: Mom Friends Forever? Are they hoping young people will watch, or people the same age as Judi and Kate? Men or women? What about the show gives you this idea?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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