Million Dollar Shoppers

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Million Dollar Shoppers TV Poster Image
Labels galore in professional-shopper reality series.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Fashion, wealth, and materialism are strong themes.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The pro shoppers enjoy living vicariously through their clients but understand that they're still working for them. Clients of all ages range from acting spoiled and entitled to being all-around obnoxious.

Violence

Arguments break out between clients over clothing and style differences. Pro shoppers Gregg and Tayler like exchanging jabs, too.

Sex

Constant references to sexy clothes, as well as conversations about the size of women's breasts and length of their legs. Most of this is within the context of the clothes they like to wear and are choosing.

Language

Occasional strong words such as "bitch" audible; curses such as "t-ts," "s--t," and "f--k" are bleeped.

Consumerism

Features an endless array of high-fashion designer logos, including Burberry, Dolce & Gabbana, Carmen Marc Valvo, Badgley Mischka, and Alexander McQueen. Expensive cars such as Mercedes-Benz are visible.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (wine, champagne) visible and frequent.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Million Dollar Shoppers features professional shoppers working for wealthy and sometimes materialistic New York-area clients and lots of ultra-expensive, high-end designer labels. It will appeal to fashionistas of all ages, but watch out for a few catty arguments, some drinking, and occasional salty vocab. References to looking sexy and the size of women's body parts are frequent, too.

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What's the story?

MILLION DOLLAR SHOPPERS is a reality series that follows some of the most elite personal shoppers in the business as they work hard to fulfill their clients' every fashion wish. It stars self-described hockey mom and fashion expert Barbet Smith; Amy Salinger, a former makeover stylist for The Oprah Winfrey Show; and Derek Roche, known for styling celebs such as Sean Diddy Combs. Also featured is the unconventional shopping-and-styling duo Gregg Asher and Tayler Carson Sandvick, whose professional relationship is sometimes as over-the-top as the people who hire them. From helping folks buy outfits for a special occasion to assisting others purchase entire new wardrobes, these professional stylists use their retail sense and fashion connections to please their rich, famous, and often high-maintenance clients. It isn't always easy to satisfy their wealthy patrons' unique tastes without sacrificing their own high standards or reputation, but the hefty commissions they earn when they succeed makes it worth their while.

Is it any good?

Million Dollar Shoppers shows the process by which professional shoppers are able to make money doing what they love to do: shop endlessly for high-end designer clothing and accessories. But, in-between client-funded shopping sprees, these professional stylists must work hard to understand and suit both their clients and their individual tastes, while balancing this with the need to ensure that what everyone ends up wearing is in good taste and appropriate for the occasion.

Fashion-conscious individuals will enjoy watching the pros sift through (and their clients try on) tens of thousands of dollars worth of designer clothing and accessories. Watching the way the stylists live and shop vicariously through their wealthy clients (and with their clients' credit cards) also is voyeuristically entertaining. It isn't for everyone, but, just like the clothes, it's a fashionista's guilty pleasure.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the way the media portrays the wealthy. What kinds of messages do shows such as this one send about people who have money? Are all people who have money interested in spending lots of cash on clothes and other material goods?

  • What kinds of subjects make for interesting reality entertainment? If you were asked to produce a reality TV show about something or someone, what would it be about? Are there people that you know in your own life that would make interesting reality-show cast members?

TV details

For kids who love fashion

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