Miss Advised

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Miss Advised TV Poster Image
Lots of sex talk by dating experts trying to find mates.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Three self-proclaimed sex and relationship experts navigate their own personal relationships. Monogamy is often criticized. Stereotypes about men and women as they relate to dating are discussed.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Each woman has her own approach to dating/relationships, but often fail to take their own advice when it comes to their personal lives. Not much racial or physical diversity.

Violence

Laurent jokingly threatens to break people's legs and or castrate them when they do not following her dating rules.

Sex

Frank discussions about sexual acts, bisexuality, and other related issues. Sexually explicit images are occasionally visible, but most of the nudity is blurred out.

Language

Words like "bitch" and "slut" are audible; curses like "ass," "s--t," and "f--k" are bleeped.

Consumerism

Emily Morse's book, Hot Sex, and Julia Allison's blog are occasionally featured. Contains references to Facebook and Craigslist. Apple computers, Ford trucks, and Mercedes-Benz cars are visible. Magazines like Marie Claire and Star are briefly mentioned.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, champagne, and cocktail drinking is frequently visible.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Miss Advised contains some frank discussions about sexual acts, salty vocab, and lots of discussions about "finding a man." Social drinking is a frequent activity. Apple computers are prominently visible, as are publications written by the experts featured here.

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What's the story?

MISS ADVISED is a reality series featuring three single relationship experts as they navigate the dating and relationship world. It stars outspoken San Francisco radio personality and sex expert Emily Morse, rule-oriented New York matchmaker Amy Laurent, and dating columnist Julia Allison, who has relocated from Chicago to Los Angeles to increase her husband-finding potential. As they share their own take on sex and dating with their listeners, readers, and clients, they each struggle to find the man of their own dreams. Sometimes they find themselves rejecting their own advice, but in the end, they each hope discover the path (and the person) that is right for them.

Is it any good?

The series offers a voyeuristic and sometimes humorous look at how these women, who are known experts in the world of relationships and sex, are navigating their way through the complex and stressful world of dating. It notes how these women have the same needs, hopes, and issues as any other person looking for a relationship. It also highlights some of the added pressures people place on them in the dating world because of their chosen careers.

Not surprisingly, the show contains its fair share of uncomfortable dating moments, as well as frank conversations about sexual acts and other mature subject matter that makes it a questionable viewing choice for younger viewers. Some folks may also be surprised by some of the dating approaches discussed here, particularly as it relates to monogamy and transgendered populations. But for those who like guilty pleasures, this one certainly fits the bill.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about dating and relationship experts. What makes a person an "expert" in this area? What are some of the stereotypes that society has about them? Does this show challenge some of these generalizations?

  • Why do you think these three women agreed to do this show? What do they stand to gain or lose?

TV details

For kids who love reality shows

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