MoCap, LLC

TV review by
Will Wade, Common Sense Media
MoCap, LLC TV Poster Image
Over-the-top mock-docu comedy isn't all that funny; no kids.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The company will do almost anything to win a contact. One character repeatedly questions the boss' ethics and business acumen, while the boss insists on taking any and all jobs, no matter how demeaning.

Violence

Several scenes feature comically simulated, over-the-top violence. The characters must simulate various elements of fictional video games, including torture and warfare. These scenes are obviously fake, but there are some brief graphic images.

Sex

Some partial nudity -- a male character appears nude, with a large electronic black box blocking his private parts (it's labeled “Mangina Censored"). Also plenty of sexual references/images (the company provides footage of lap dances, for example), and one female character frequently appears in a bikini for no particular reason.

Language

Lots of swearing, including “s--t,” “p---y,” “a--hole,” “bitch,” and more, though oddly, a few words are also bleeped.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this mockumentary series about a struggling company that provides content for video games isn't intended for kids. Expect simulated torture scenes, plenty of sexual references, lots of swearing (including "s--t"), some partial male nudity, and a young woman who often shows up in a bikini for no obvious reason. There are also a lot of over-the-top set pieces, most of which feature a scruffy, overweight guy squeezed into an unappealing skintight blue suit.

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What's the story?

MOCAP, LLC, the show, is about the trials and tribulations of Mocap, LLC, the company, a struggling business that creates motion capture footage for video games -- including gunfights, torture sequences, lap dancing, wrestling matches, and much more. Jeff (Jonathan Gabrus) is the crash-test dummy here, a scruffy, heavyset man who doesn't look appealing squeezed into the tight blue outfit that filming the scenes requires and who's clearly suffering as the designated victim. Frank (Chris DeLuca) is the boss who's so determined to keep the company afloat that he's willing to take even the most dangerous and demeaning jobs, Claire (Kara Klenk) is the office manager and voice of reason -- though her common-sense objections to taking on some especially unpleasant jobs are overruled every time -- and Kendall (Lauren Turek) is the attractive intern; it's not quite clear what her job is, but it seems to involve spending a lot of time in a bikini.

Is it any good?

MoCap, LLC uses the increasingly popular mockumentary format, providing a "behind-the-scenes" look at a struggling company. When it's done well (a la The Office), this approch offers characters the chance to directly explain their aspirations and motivations during key dramatic moments. When done poorly, as it is here, it serves more as a crutch that the writers use to string together a bunch of loosely connected scenes that don't really fit together into a narrative.

The basic premise -- that the company is so desperate they'll take on any gig -- gives the creators license to throw in almost anything. Let's torture the guy in the blue suit! What about an Apocalypse Now spoof! Hey, can we paint the intern green? These scenes play more like skits from Saturday Night Live (and not during one of the show's better seasons) than a coherent story.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the mockumentary format. Do you think it's as effective here as it is on shows like The Office? Do you think the show could also work as a more conventional sitcom? What shows or movies make the best use of the mockumentary model (This Is Spinal Tap, for example), and why? Families can also discuss the show's style of humor. Is it edgy or offensive? Who decides where the line falls?

TV details

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