Mr. Inbetween

TV review by
Mark Dolan, Common Sense Media
Mr. Inbetween TV Poster Image
Foul-mouthed gangster show hides sly, tender dark comedy.

Parents say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Ray's hitman life is not to be emulated.

Positive Role Models & Representations

For all of Ray’s violent actions he's a loving father and brother; Britt is is a curious girl who doesn't suffer fools gladly.

Violence

A man is shot in the head; characters are violently beaten; bloody, injured faces are shown.

Sex

The loan shark works out of a strip club; a DVD box of a porn video is shown and its content is discussed.

Language

Multiple variations of "F--k;" "s--t;" "c--ksucker," etc.

 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters drink beer at home and in clubs.

What parents need to know

Parent need to know that Mr. Inbetween is a series about a low-level Australian gangster. It follows his daily routine, which includes his role as an enforcer for a loan shark, as he tries to balance work with maintaining a loving relationship with his rascally eight-year daughter. The show pulls no punches when it comes to language, violence, and adult themes. A man is shot in the head; characters are violently beaten; bloody, injured faces are shown, and swearing includes "f--k" and "s--t." Older teens interested in stories about antiheroes may have interest in this show.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byBigguy29 October 12, 2018

This is kinda hard to rate

This I a very tricky show to rate I whole heartedly enjoy the show but due to some content I am not sure how much I recommend that you watch this it's hila... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

MR. INBETWEEN follows Ray Shoesmith (Scott Ryan), an enforcer for a loan shark in underworld of Melbourne, Australia. With his bald head, wispy goatee and no-nonsense manner, Ray presents himself as quite a menacing figure. But when he’s not threatening or killing people who owe money, he’s a loving father to his precocious 8-year-old daughter Britt and a caring sibling to his ill older brother. He even strikes up a new relationship with a pretty paramedic after they meet cute in a dog park. The show essentially follows Ray as he goes about his daily routine, bouncing back between the violent, foul-mouthed world of his job and more tender moments of normalcy (which he seems to long for) in his personal life.

Is it any good?

The latest entry in to the growing ranks of TV antiheroes, Mr. Inbetween treads some pretty familiar territory. And while it isn’t groundbreaking, show creator and star Scott Ryan brings a certain charisma to the role of Ray that makes Mr. Inbetween worth the time. Not classically or even roguishly handsome, Ryan's bloke of a hitman feels like a cool supporting character who got a surprise promotion to leading man. He also is able to shift from believably menacing to tender to humorously bemused, sometimes in the same scene. It might be this unexpected dark comedic undertone that sets this show apart, and at the end of the day it might actually have more in common with fellow FX shows Atlanta and Better Things than it does with Breaking Bad or The Sopranos.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the duality of Ray’s character in Mr. Inbetween. Is it believable that a someone who deals so easily in violence could also be such a caring father?

  • What is an antihero? Does Ray fit the definition? What are some other characters you've encountered that could be considered antiheroes?

TV details

For kids who love action

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