My Kitchen Rules

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
My Kitchen Rules TV Poster Image
B-list celeb cooking competition is entertaining enough.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Cooking isn't easy. Neither is taking criticism.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Some teams are more competitive, friendly than others. 

Violence

Some yelling, arguing.

Sex

Some strong innuendo; raunchy jokes, cheating, sex tapes referenced. 

Language

"Hell," "crap"; curses bleeped, mouths blurred.

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, champagne visible.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the reality competition My Kitchen Rules features celebrities trying to out-cook each other. There's some occasional arguing and yelling, and some argumentative behavior. The language can get tough ("hell," "crap"; bleeped curses with blurred mouths), and there's some strong innuendo, including references to some well-publicized celebrity scandals, plus a bit of alcohol consumption. But overall it's a fun show for families with tweens and teens to enjoy.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 11 years old May 8, 2018

love this show to death

this show teaches me how to make recipes when I am older. I think its a great show. it is for kids and adults, adults will probably like it more, but I think i... Continue reading

What's the story?

Based on the Australian reality competition of the same name, MY KITCHEN RULES features celebrities competing to see who can throw the best dinner party. Five teams consisting of Brandy Norwood and her brother Ray; singer Naomi Judd and her husband, Larry Strickland; Real Housewives cast member Brandi Glanville and her friend Dean Sheremet; comedian Andrew Dice Clay and his wife, Valerie Silverstein; and singer Lance Bass and his mom, Diane, each must throw a dinner party with a meal consisting of an appetizer and an entrée. The dinner guests, who just happen to be the other teams, score them on the taste of the overall meal. Also judging their meals are chefs Cat Cora and Curtis Stone. After the five teams cook, one is eliminated while the others move on to other kitchen challenges. The duo that out-cooks the competition wins. 

Is it any good?

This lighthearted but rather slow-paced series features B-list stars doing their best to impress their peers and two master chefs by cooking elevated dishes. But the drama comes less from the competition and more from the reality show-type banter of the dinner guests, which ranges from raunchy jokes to conversations about some well-publicized tabloid scandals. There are even a few snarky exchanges between teams that have nothing to do with food. 

Watching each team try to stay calm and prepare something that looks and tastes like a refined meal is funny at times. But despite the presence of chefs Cora and Stone, the celebrities' lack of real expertise about food preparation makes the overall judging process feel disingenuous. Some of the cast members seem to playing up to the cameras, too. Overall, My Kitchen Rules may have some celebrity appeal, but it doesn't offer anything significant about cooking. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about cooking competitions such as the one on My Kitchen Rules. Is the way food is prepared on these shows any different from how it's prepared in a home? Why is making sure the food tastes good not the only thing that matters during cooking challenges?  

  • Why are cooking shows so popular? Is My Kitchen Rules meant to be informative, or is it simply designed to be entertaining? 

TV details

For kids who love cooking shows

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