Nail'd It

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Nail'd It TV Poster Image
Dull nail-design competition for manicure fans only.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series demonstrates how nail art has been elevated to an artistic form of self-expression.

Positive Role Models & Representations

All the contestants are talented, but some of the designers are more humble than others. Some of the designers exhibit some catty behavior, but nothing's too over the top.

Violence

Many of the nails look like claws and sport skeletons and other mildly creepy images.  

Sex

Nails are often referred to as looking sexy.

Language

Words such as "ass," "damn," and "hell" audible. Curses such as "f--k" bleeped. 

Consumerism

Publications such as Nail It!, Zap2it.com, and BuzzFeed are featured or discussed. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Some designs incorporate icons such as martini glasses. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the reality competition Nail'd It features some mildly catty behavior, iffy vocabulary, and nail-themed magazines, blogs, and other publications. It has some teen appeal, but younger kids probably won't be interested. 

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What's the story?

NAIL'D IT is a reality competition show that features up-and-coming nail artists competing for cash. Hosted by Adrienne Bailon, each episode features three passionate nail artists clawing their way to a major cash prize. The contestants show off their talent during a variety of challenges designed to test their technique, style, and creativity. The artist who manages to impress the judges, including industry icon Jan Arnold, celebrity nail artist Tom Bachik, celebrity manicurist Terrance Terry, and world-renowned nail art competition judge Elaine T. Watson, gets $10,000 and a guaranteed place in the finals. The runner-up gets another chance to compete, and the loser is eliminated. The winner of the overall competition walks away with a $100,000 grand prize and the chance to have his or her art featured on the cover of Nail It! magazine. In between scenes, top nail designers offer tips on how to create a variety of nail designs at home. 

Is it any good?

From quickly creating designs using glitter, tape, beads, foil, and even flowers to please fashion critics to designing nail patterns inspired by shoes, the artists create intricate and unique nail sets that demonstrate how nail art and design have been elevated from simply putting on colorful polish to creating 3-D works of art. It also highlights the wide range of decorative styles the different nail designers are developing.  

Some of the drama among the contestants seems a little contrived, and the process of creating the nail sets feels a little slow despite the use of some basic special effects to make it seem faster. But folks who enjoy getting their nails done or who like nail art will find the work presented here interesting. Chances are they'll be inspired to create their own designs, too. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the origin of nail art. When did polishing one's nails become popular? How did this evolve into sophisticated nail designs? Can people who wear these kinds of nails actually use their fingers? Or is it just for show?

  • Are there any stereotypes on display in this show?

TV details

For kids who love reality TV

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