Nature, Inc.

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Nature, Inc. TV Poster Image
Informative series looks at the economics of the ecosystem.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series offers a pro-environmental message as it discusses the relationship between the ecosystem and the global economy. It often seems critical of businesses and economic decision makers who don't seem to understand how their policies impact the environment. Many of the experts argue that consumer behavior must change in order to protect the environment.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Features a wide range of researchers and activists who are committed to protecting the planet’s natural resources.

Violence

In some episodes, the devastation caused by natural disasters like hurricanes is shown.

Sex
Language
Consumerism

Farms, companies, and lobbyists from around the world (including stateside businesses like Hunter Farms and the Almond Board of California) are featured, as are companies doing environmental research.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this British series attempts to put a dollar value on the ways that nature sustains global economic growth. It takes a rather critical tone, suggesting that environmental and financial losses will continue to grow if policymakers don't focus more on the relationship between the economy and the environment. Various businesses, corporate lobbies, and environmental experts are featured. Overall the series is interesting and informative, but the economy-focused material will probably go over little kids' head and isn't likely to be very compelling for older ones.

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What's the story?

NATURE, INC. attempts to put a monetary value on the various ways that natural systems sustain economic growth. From the bee pollination of almond blossoms to the protection of natural coastal barriers, environmental experts and ecological economists show how nature contributes to the production of goods that people consume every day -- and comment on the sustainability of the resources necessary to create them. They also assess the increasingly negative financial impact that global economic policy and market demands are having on natural ecosystems and highlight how natural solutions can inspire commercially viable technical innovations.

Is it any good?

This intelligent British import attempts to appeal to American audiences by using dollar amounts to emphasize the value of nature and the costs associated with negatively impacting the environment. It also underscores how today’s economic policies and consumer demands are directly related to issues like deforestation and the lack of crop diversity.

The series takes a rather critical tone toward policymakers, implying that they fail to grasp the direct connection between the state of the ecosystem and state of the global economy. But Nature, Inc. definitely succeeds in showing how tampering with natural phenomena -- no matter how small -- can have far-reaching and expensive consequences.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how the media can be used to teach people about the environment. What do you think are some of the most important environmental issues being discussed in the media today?

  • Have you ever thought about nature's role in creating the products you consume every day, like chocolate or shampoo? Where can you find out more?

TV details

For kids who love being green

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