New York Goes to Hollywood

TV review by
Kari Croop, Common Sense Media
New York Goes to Hollywood TV Poster Image
Pointless TV publicity stunt isn't for kids.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

"Fame-seeking reality star seeks even more fame." End of story. No positive messages here.

Violence

Some pushing and shoving, but things only get violent when it's called for in a scene.

Sex

Three words: Lots of cleavage. Pollard also wears plenty of skimpy outfits and is shown kissing a man passionately as part of an "acting exercise."

Language

Pollard relies on foul language to express herself. She seems to favor "bitch," "ass," "s--t" (bleeped), and "f--k" (bleeped).

Consumerism

New York is selling herself like a product, and it's obvious. During a commercial break, there's also an advertisement for rhapsody.com that plugs the show's theme song ("The World Should Revolve Around Me" by Little Jackie).

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Adults are sometimes shown drinking alcohol.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the star of this reality show -- already a veteran of several series on VH1 -- has a penchant for nasty quips that you'd never want kids repeating, including choice phrases like "Get the f--k off my property, you skanky-ass bitch" (although "f--k" is bleeped). You'll also see lots of cleavage, seriously skimpy outfits, and sexually charged "acting exercises," plus some drinking by adults. There's really nothing redeeming here, nor is there intended to be -- this is adult-targeted guilty pleasure reality TV through and through.

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What's the story?

After guest starring as herself on FX's Nip/Tuck and making an appearance in the film First Sunday (co-starring Ice Cube and Tracy Morgan), reality star Tiffany "New York" Pollard -- best known for shaking her assets for rapper Flava Flav on VH1's Flavor of Love -- is ready to be taken seriously as an actress. And that's pretty much the gist of this series, which chronicles her attempts to launch a successful acting career.

Is it any good?

According to Pollard's introductory voice-over, NEW YORK GOES TO HOLLYWOOD was her idea, meaning she pitched the concept to VH1. In return, the network gave her 30 days to make it as an actress -- and a high-profile way to promote her questionable talents. But with its awkwardly scripted approach to "reality," the show hardly adds anything valuable to an already saturated reality TV market. In fact, if Pollard's performance here says anything about her acting abilities, she should consider another career path.

Ultimately, New York Goes to Hollywood serves as a delivery system for Pollard's street-inspired insults, which is hardly top-tier content for kids. Need examples? Well, this one says it all: When a female candidate applying to be Pollard's assistant says that she's Christian and doesn't believe in premarital sex, Pollard snaps back, "Sex is very important to me. Plus, you're wearin', like, a sailor shirt. Bitch, you know you don't own no boat. So sail your ass up outta my house." Aye aye, matey.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why they think Tiffany "New York" Pollard has been featured in so many VH1 reality shows (including Flavor of Love and the subsequent spin-off I Love New York). Why has she received so much exposure? Do you think she deserves it? Do you find her entertaining? Why or why not? Are you surprised by the fact that a former reality show star now wants to become an actress? Does this make you feel any differently about the "reality" aspect of reality shows in general?

TV details

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