Notorious

TV review by
Kari Croop, Common Sense Media
Notorious TV Poster Image
Ludicrous TV news drama is lazy -- and eye-rollingly sleazy.

Parents say

age 14+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Major themes include manipulation, dishonesty, and duplicity; truth is often used as a bargaining chip.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Though the series attempts to showcase strong female characters, they're largely two-dimensional. On the plus side, female characters wield considerable power and work well as a team.

Violence

Storylines involve murder and death, with considerable blood.

Sex

Simulated sex with bare skin and revealing lingerie but no nudity; moaning, steamy kissing; suggestive phrases such as, "How do you like your meat?"

Language

"Ass," "hell," "bitch."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Social drinking; some storylines involve illegal drugs.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Notorious centers on the producer of a fictional cable news program (think Larry King Live) and her ethically murky friendship/working relationship with a duplicitous defense attorney. You'll see steamy scenes involving simulated sex (with audible moaning, bare skin, and lingerie but no nudity) and hear characters use suggestive phrases such as, "How do you like your meat?" along with words such as "ass" and "bitch." You'll also see dead bodies and some blood, considering the investigation of a high-profile murder is a major part of the plot.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bychris d. September 28, 2016

not as abd as cms claims but not terific either

ok after watching the premeire of this i can say two things 1 cms is wrong its not that bad i have seen sooo much worse but 2.its very scandilous that might mak... Continue reading

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Power-wielding television news producer Julia George (Piper Perabo) is NOTORIOUS for getting on top of a sensational story and driving ratings for high-maintenance host Louise Herrick (Kate Jennings Grant) through the roof. But the key to her success lies in part in her murky working relationship with Jake Gregorian (Daniel Sunjata), a charismatic defense attorney to the rich and famous with a serious gift for manipulation.

Is it any good?

With two-dimensional characters and cringe-worthy dialogue, this is an ultimately laughable attempt to compete with successful female-driven dramas such as Scandal and How to Get Away with Murder. (And in case it's unclear, it soooo doesn't.) But that doesn't stop NOTORIOUS from throwing everything it has to offer -- including office sex, murder, and political blackmail -- at the proverbial wall to see what sticks. Trouble is, when all that muck slides down the wall where it belongs, you're left with an overdone template that's hardly worth your time.

In a sense, it's a shame, considering the series puts forth at least four potentially compelling female characters: Perabo's ethically ambiguous but occasionally principled Julia; Jennings Grant's scene-stealing Louise (in spite of her ridiculous antics); ambitious journalism grad Megan Byrd (Sepideh Moafi); and junior attorney Ella Benjamin (Aimeé Teegarden). But any hope of presenting them as multidimensional career women with complex minds and souls is hopelessly squandered with lines such as, "You're a tough-ass bitch! You can do anything." It somehow feels like the opposite of girl power.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Notorious's premise and whether it works. Is it closer to fantasy or reality? What are the real-life connections among politics, celebrity, and the news media?

  • How do Notorious's female characters compare to other strong female characters on television (think Scandal, How to Get Away with Murder, or The Good Wife)? How do they measure up as role models?

  • Who's most likely to tune in to Notorious, and why? Who's the target audience, and how can you tell?

TV details

For kids who love TV drama

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