Players Get Played

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Players Get Played TV Poster Image
Voyeuristic reality lets angry women expose cheating men.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Lovers expose, confront cheating partners.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Men cheat, lie; women seek truth, revenge.

Violence

Arguing, throwing, yelling, slapping. 

Sex

Infidelity a major theme. Innuendo. Sexy outfits, images, male stripping. 

Language

"Hell," "ass," "piss"; bleeped curses.

Consumerism

Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Apple products. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, champagne, beer consumption. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Players Get Played is a reality series about men's infidelity and women's revenge. There's lots of catty behavior, arguing, innuendo, and on occasion yelling, slapping, and throwing. There's also lots of salty vocabulary and drinking. Apple products and social media such as Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook also are prominently featured. It presents itself as being empowering to women, but it doesn't send a lot of positive messages about them. 

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What's the story?

PLAYERS GET PLAYED is a reality series that features women who are being cheated on by the same man getting together to call his bluff. Each episode introduces you to a man who believes he's on a show that deals with dating and relationships and who just happens to be dating multiple women. The problem? Each of the women he's dating believes she's his exclusive girlfriend. After one of the women, who has her suspicions, begins investigating using social media, she connects with the other "girlfriends" to get information about their relationships. Ultimately, they get together and confront him about his dishonesty. 

Is it any good?

Though it attempts to present women as strong and empowered by collectively confronting their cheating boyfriends, Players Get Played is a voyeuristic and negative reality show that presents infidelity and revenge as entertainment. Part of the fun is the highlighting of the various ways a partner cheats, while the girlfriends' reactions -- which range from anger at each other to ultimate forgiveness of their cheating boyfriends -- also create interesting moments. 

Some people will find humor in the attempts made by the cheating men to justify their behavior, which often includes blaming the women for their actions. Others will be nauseated by it. Adding to the seediness are the show's producers, who step in front of the cameras to "guide" women toward the steps they should take to find out more information about the "other women." Adults looking for a guilty pleasure might find it here, but the messages the show sends about women aren't very positive. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the role social media plays in our day-to-day lives. What kinds of things do you like to post on sites and apps such as Twitter or Facebook? What kinds of things should you never post?  

  • Have you ever seen things on social media you wish you hadn't, such as inappropriate images or bullying? Parents: What kinds of things can you do to help kids be safer online?

TV details

  • Premiere date: June 10, 2015
  • Network: Oxygen
  • Genre: Reality TV
  • TV rating: TV-14

For kids who love reality TV

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