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Press Your Luck

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
Press Your Luck TV Poster Image
Reboot of '80s game show is glitzy fun, if a bit too long.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 8+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Good sporting conduct.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The show is hosted and produced by a woman, Elizabeth Banks. Contestants come from all walks of life.

Violence
Sex
Language
Consumerism

Brand-name prizes are sometimes mentioned: Apple computers, car companies like Jaguar and Jeep, and more.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Press Your Luck is a reboot of the classic 1980s game show. This version is produced and hosted by actress Elizabeth Banks (Hunger Games, Pitch Perfect) and runs a good 30 minutes longer than the original series thanks to a newly added bonus round. Some brand names come up randomly throughout the show, as contestants can win prizes like Gucci bags and accessories, Jeep Cherokees, and MacBook Pro laptops. The humor is very mellow and not bawdy -- much like the original, it's an inoffensive game show that families with tweens should enjoy.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 4 and 9 year old Written bySammytricky1245 June 30, 2019

Agreeing on a actor hosting

Well we also watch card sharks by Joel Mchale but, is a great show for my kid too.
Teen, 13 years old Written byiiAJ July 17, 2019

The best revival of a game show. Period.

This is one of the BEST game show revivals I’ve ever seen! I wasn’t alive to see the originals, but I’ve watched a few episodes and the set modernized into the... Continue reading

What's the story?

PRESS YOUR LUCK revamps the popular 1980s game show of the same name, this time hosted and produced by actress Elizabeth Banks. Each episode features three contestants who compete for the chance to win up to $1,000,000 by answering trivia questions and earning spins on the "Big Board": a game board that's full of cash and prizes including cars, electronics, and vacations. It won't be so easy, though, as they may also land on a dreaded "Whammy" square, which results in an animated devil-type imp character swooping down and erasing all their winnings. Once contestants earn four Whammies, they're out, leaving the winner to compete in a four-level bonus round that involves more spins on the board (and more potential Whammies to hit) but no additional trivia questions.

Is it any good?

Ultimately, there's nothing particularly exciting about this game (original or rebooted version); we're just watching contestants spin over and over and waiting to see if they lose all their money. That said, Press Your Luck looks great, with a flashy modernized set and an amiable host who does a nice job interacting with contestants and keeping things moving. They've kept the wisecracking, roughly animated "Whammy" characters from the original series, which may push some happy nostalgia buttons for old-school fans, but added an all-new bonus round, which lengthens the episodes to a full hour -- which seems a bit long for this particular game, and may test some viewers' attention spans. Overall, though, it's harmless fun the whole family can enjoy.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the recent trend in rebooting 1970s and '80s game shows. What is so appealing about bringing these shows back? 

  • This new version of Press Your Luck features a bonus round, making the show a full hour as compared to the 1980s version's 30 minutes. Do you think it was necessary to do this in order to adapt the show for modern audiences?

  • Would you ever want to compete on a game show? Why or why not?

TV details

For kids who love game shows

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