Quick Draw McGraw

TV review by
KJ Dell Antonia, Common Sense Media
Quick Draw McGraw TV Poster Image
Horse sheriff offers justice in classic cartoon.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Plenty of now-dated stereotypes: A sidekick character speaks in parody of a Mexican accent, women are always helpless victims, etc. (though that party is often tongue-in-cheek). The villains are always captured, but it's pretty clear that the triumph of good over evil (which often has an ironic twist, such the villain voluntarily going to jail for a supply of addictive dog treats) isn't really intended as a strong/obvious moral lesson.

Violence & Scariness

Quick Draw carries and uses a cartoon six-shooter -- which only singes its victims -- and hits people with a guitar when he's disguised as El Kabong.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

This cartoon was produced in the late '50s, and some characters may smoke.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that now-dated stereotypes abound in this late-'50s cartoon. Quick Draw's sidekick, burro Baba Looie, speaks with a parody of a Mexican accent and is subordinate to his horse partner despite being possibly more intelligent. Women are helpless victims (although that's usually presented in a very tongue-in-cheek way). There's some cartoon violence involving Quick Draw's gun, but no one is ever seriously or permanently hurt.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 12 years old May 31, 2009
Teen, 16 years old Written byMy favorite tv shows May 31, 2017

What's the story?

QUICK DRAW MCGRAW follows a talking cartoon horse sheriff (voiced by Daws Butler) and his burro, Baba Looie (also Butler), who get involved in a series of brief Western adventures. They capture a variety of villains, sometimes with the help of dog Snuffles (Butler again), who will do anything for the dog biscuits that take him into amusing paroxysms of bliss. Quick Draw sometimes disguises himself as "El Kabong" in a parody of Zorro, using a guitar as a weapon (normally he carries a six shooter). In its current form on Boomerang, the show includes only the shorts featuring Quick Draw himself, although the original series -- like many of its time -- included cartoons starring other characters as well.

Is it any good?

Quick Draw McGraw is kind of funny. It's a part of cultural and cartoon history, it serves as a good introduction to the Westerns it parodies, and it certainly won't do kids any harm (unless they're likely to be strongly influenced by some now-dated '50s stereotypes). The art is so simple that you can almost see the flipping film stills. Bottom line? It's a good early classic cartoon.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what types of media the show is poking fun at (namely, Westerns and Lone Ranger-type series that were popular at the time). Is it funny to watch this series if you haven't seen those? Can you think of any newer shows that do the same kind of thing? Do you have to "get" all of a show's jokes to enjoy it? Families can also discuss why a character like Baba Looie wouldn't be around today. Why do you think he would upset some people? Is it OK to make fun of people's accents? Why or why not?

TV details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate