Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares (UK)

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares (UK) TV Poster Image
More brutal insults from foul-mouthed UK chef.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Although it's his job to offer criticism, Ramsay is often brutal in his comments about people's failures and tends to resort to offensive language to make his points.

Violence

No violence, but a few vomiting scenes as Ramsay shares his dislike of certain dishes. He can also get very hostile and angry.

Sex
Language

Anything and everything is part of standard conversation. "Damn," "s--t," "ass," and "hell" are audible, but Ramsay's personal favorite, "f--k," is bleeped.

Consumerism

Ramsay is his own brand at this point.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Diners drink wine and beer with dinner.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this restaurant-set British reality series comes with a strong-language advisory for good reason, since star Gordon Ramsay makes no effort to temper his infamously foul mouth in other people's kitchens. "Damn," "ass," and "s--t" are used frequently (and are all unbleeped), but nothing is as popular as Ramsay's many variations on "f--k" (that one is bleeped, sometimes so frequently that it's hard to understand the surrounding dialogue). He's also rudely critical of restaurant employees' and owners' shortcomings and doesn't shy away from personal attacks.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 2 year old Written bygerbowski October 22, 2012

A good show, but with a lot of profanity

I don't get the reviews on this website at all. In this one, the reviewer give's Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmares only two stars, but then writes an... Continue reading
Adult Written bycastlerockdays June 14, 2009

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's the story?

Your finances are in the red, your kitchen staff is on a smoke break, and you can count the folks in your dining room on one hand. When your restaurant is in need of professional intervention, who can you call? Why, Gordon Ramsay, of course. In RAMSAY'S KITCHEN NIGHTMARES, the renowned British restaurateur makes "restaurant calls" to nitpick the shortcomings of troubled food establishments and help the owners rebuild their businesses in a matter of weeks. In each episode, Ramsay visits a failing restaurant to observe its functionality and assess the reasons for its decline. He observes the meal-preparation process, pokes through the refrigerators, analyzes the menu choices, and gathers data about the patron base, all in an effort to help redesign the owner's plan for attracting and maintaining clientele.

Is it any good?

Viewers familiar with Ramsay's fiery brand of criticism will expect nothing less than the brutal honesty he brings to his consulting gig; tensions rise quickly as he lashes out at everyone he feels is coming up short. No one's feelings are spared as Ramsay hurls red-letter insults for inefficiency, lack of skill, and sloppy work habits. But when he turns his efforts to teaching, he shows a bit more patience -- and it's here that his true expertise shows through. Ramsay helps owners simplify their business plan, honing in on a customer base and designing menu choices to match their needs. He teaches chefs how to cut costs and increase efficiency -- and, in some extreme cases, how to cook.

If you like your entertainment brimming with confrontation and tense moments, Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares is right up your alley; if not, you might want to pass. It feels more like a soap box from which the foul-mouthed chef can unleash his fury of insults and four-letter words than anything else, and by the end of each hour, the process of weeding through bleeps (which replace his favorite word, "f--k") to cobble together the actual dialogue becomes tiresome. There's so little actual substance here that there's no reason to think you'll be missing anything by turning it off.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why larger-than-life personalities like Ramsay are the bread and butter of reality TV. Is Ramsay TV-worthy? Why or why not? Families can also discuss giving and receiving criticism. Why is it sometimes hard to take criticism? How do you react to it? Do you ever find it difficult to critique someone else's work? Does it make a difference whether the person is a friend or not? Why or why not? How does Ramsay's aggressive demeanor affect how his critiques are received?

TV details

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate