Ready Jet Go!

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Ready Jet Go! TV Poster Image
Learning abounds in delightful science-based series.
 Parents recommend

Parents say

age 4+
Based on 7 reviews

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 6 reviews

We think this TV show stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show incorporates scientific concepts such as solar energy and force, illustrating them through the characters' experiences. Unfamiliar terms are defined in dialogue ("Binoculars make faraway things look closer" and "Solar panels transfer the sun's energy to power," for example).

Positive Messages

Kids see Jet learn new things by being curious, asking questions, and making observations, all the while having lots of fun. Strong messages about family relationships, friendships, empathy, and responsibility. Diverse characters and gender roles, including Sean's mom, who is an accomplished scientist. The kids do keep secret the fact that Jet and his family are aliens and even take trips into space without their parents knowing.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Jet and his friends are passionate about their interests, especially when it comes to topics of science. They work effectively as a team and learn well together. His parents are quirky and often make mistakes by human standards, but they appreciate the new culture they're experiencing. They're also very learned in matters of technology and astrology.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Ready Jet Go! is a science-based series that teaches kids about astronomy and technology through the experiences of a young alien who's taken up residence on Earth with his family. Concepts such as force and energy are defined and given practical examples within the context of the stories, and kids see how the characters' curiosity yields many learning opportunities. There are strong messages about teamwork and friendship, and there's some diversity among the characters. Jet's friends do keep their space travels hidden from their parents, so it's worth talking to them about if and when it's appropriate to keep secrets from grown-ups.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bycathiw1 June 2, 2016

Entertaining but inaccurate.

If you're going to do a science education show, how about actually educating the kids? This show has kids believing in dodgem asteroid belts and other ina... Continue reading
Parent of a 5 year old Written byannb3 April 8, 2016

Jeopardy question

I watched Ready Jet Go with my son, that evening I watched Jeopardy. I was able to answer the Final Jeopardy question because it was a question about one of Mar... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byPhillip Prokopenko March 28, 2016

Cheap Cash-grab

Now, I don't mean to offend anyone, so if you like this show, that's your opinion. Anyway, this has got to be one of the worst shows on PBS kids. To s... Continue reading
Kid, 10 years old July 23, 2016

Superb

i think it's a great show. it based on the Nick Jr. Show. well anyway a kid would enjoy that show

What's the story?

In READY JET GO!, Jet Propulsion (voiced by Ashleigh Ball) and his family leave their home planet of Boltron 7 to pose as earthlings and experience the planet up close. Jet quickly befriends neighborhood kids Sean (William Ainscough) and Sydney (Dalila Bela), both of whom have a passion for science and are eager to swap knowledge with Jet. Together they explore how things work on Earth, both scientifically and with regard to human relationships. In some cases, they also get to hop aboard Jet's family's van, which doubles as a spacecraft that takes them to the outer reaches of the solar system to visit other planets.

Is it any good?

Thoroughly engaging and packed with educational content, this exceptional series is a fun way for kids to learn about science and astronomy. Jet's excitement for the human experience is matched only by Sean and Sydney's eagerness to learn all about outer space; put the three of them together, and it's a true celebration of the joy of discovery. Whether it's executing a rescue mission for a Mars rover or combining daily chores with experiments in force, Jet and his friends have a lot to teach kids through their own experiences.

On the more humorous side, Jet's parents' learning curve is filled with funny misunderstandings of the human ways of things, and both kids and parents will have a lot of fun watching them get the hang of "throwing a salad together" and understanding the "string" part of beans. Their Amelia Bedelia-like follies are good for some laughs, but they also reflect the challenges of immersing yourself in a culture that's different from your own.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how Ready Jet Go! teaches viewers about science. Can you replicate some of the experiments the characters do to learn new concepts? Are your kids as intrigued by science as Jet and his friends are?

  • What does Jet learn about Earth families by watching Sean and Sydney? What similarities exist among all families? Kids: What are your responsibilities at home?

  • What do Sean and Sydney teach Jet about friendship? Do your kids and their friends enjoy learning things together?

  • How do the characters in Ready Jet Go! demonstrate curiosity? Why is this an important character strength?

TV details

Character Strengths

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