Repeat After Me

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Repeat After Me TV Poster Image
Celebs prank bystanders on hilarious hidden-camera show.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

It showcases actors' talents while creating laughs.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Wendi McLendon-Covey purposely tries to make the actors look and act weird. 

Violence

Occasional outbursts; humorous references to being shot. 

Sex

Occasional references to genitals and inappropriate relationships, which may go over younger kids' heads. 

Language

"Damn," "ass." 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

References to smoking, alcohol use. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the improv reality series Repeat After Me gives celebrities the chance to "punk" innocent bystanders as they obey commands from the show's host, funny lady Wendi McClendon-Covey. The show offers lots of funny moments, but some of the humor contains some sexual references (genitalia, inappropriate liaisons) that will go over younger kids' heads, as well as a few strong words ("damn," "ass"). Jokes include mild references to shooting, drinking, and smoking, but none of these things is shown. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byBigchris February 24, 2015

Hilarious but depends on your kids

Watched this after fresh off the boat with my sibs last night and I must admit I think we all had a really good time no unnessisary language " one damn hel... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written bymcthemovie July 9, 2016

10 or 11 and up

Well, Ive seen the show before, many many times. Its funny, BUT It does have some dirty humor so I advise 10 and up or maybe 12 and up.

What's the story?

Produced by Ellen DeGeneres, REPEAT AFTER ME is a hidden-camera show in which celebrities are put into very uncomfortable situations. Through a hidden ear piece, Reno 911! star Wendi McLendon-Covey instructs celebrities such as Scott Foley and Sarah Hyland to repeat everything she says while they interact with people on the street. After approximately ten minutes of silly hijinks, the victims are told the truth and introduced to an appreciative audience. At the end of each episode, McLendan-Covey picks what she believes is the best improv moment. 

Is it any good?

From creating inappropriate interview situations for a prospective nanny to driving a French language teacher nuts, the series shows how talented actors are able to take direction and create hilariously strange moments for the people around them. There are some cringe-worthy moments, but the situations are constructed to make the actors look humorously foolish, while the "victims" are mostly confused (though some of their reactions are priceless). Overall, it's a genuinely entertaining show that offers lots of laugh-out-loud fun for tweens and teens. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about hidden-camera shows. How would you feel if you were the victim on a show like this one? 

  • When do pranks go too far? Should stereotyping and other inappropriate references ever be used to create a laugh? 

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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