Roommates

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
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Sitcom's risque content makes it iffy for young teens.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The young adult characters often lie and misrepresent themselves to each other, and Katie's relationship with her boyfriend is more about sex than affection. Mark is so desperate to win Katie's heart that he willingly suffers humiliation for her. Premarital sex is the norm among dating couples.

Violence
Sex

Frequent sexual references and innuendo are a main source of the show's humor. Terms like "getting some" and "it's sex-o-clock" are common, as are insinuations of sexual activity. In one segment, for instance, a woman's roommates find soiled tissues throughout the apartment after she and her boyfriend had sex there. Partial nudity includes side views of a naked man (though his genitals aren't shown) and women in bras and lingerie. Couples are shown kissing and fondling in bed.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that the hormonally charged young adults at the center of this sitcom engage in plenty of sex-related talk (terms like "getting some" and allusions to recent sexual encounters are common). You can also expect make-out sessions and partial nudity (women in bras and lingerie and, in at least one scene, an obscured side view of a naked man). Little is off limits when it comes to sex, and the characters' romantic relationships are often rooted in physical attraction rather than affection. None of this is likely to surprise most teens, but parents will still want to follow up with their own take on responsible adult behavior.

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What's the story?

In ROOMMATES, a mismatched group of young adults sorts out the uncertainties of life and love. A chance encounter between Mark (Tyler Francavilla) and his high school crush, Katie (Dorian Brown), leads him to move into the vacant room in her apartment in the hopes of finally catching her eye. But the price for this shot at love is high, and Mark discovers that often the only thing harder than winning Katie's affection is getting along with his other new roommates, Hope (Tamera Mowry) and James (Tommy Dewey). As they set out to find themselves, the group must also find some common ground to help each other through the new challenges they'll face as adults.

Is it any good?

On paper, this show's plot bears strong similarity to Friends -- but don't get too excited about the possibility of a new classic sitcom just yet. Roommates feels more like a cheap knock-off; dull writing, predictable stories, and the so-so cast ensure that it's easily forgettable.

Because all of the main characters are twenty-somethings with raging hormones, much of the show's content -- and humor -- is rooted in sexuality, including plenty of premarital sex. Dating is more about physical pleasure than emotional stability, sending potentially iffy messages to teens about mutually respectful relationships. If your teens do watch, take the opportunity to talk with them about the benefits and responsibilities of young adulthood.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the characters' situations. Which character could you most relate to? Why? How realistic do the characters' lives seem? Do you think there would be different/additional consequences for their behavior in real life? Teens: What are your life goals? Where do you think you'll be in relation to those goals when you're living on your own? How might you handle any setbacks you face?

TV details

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