Sci-Fi Science: Physics of the Impossible

TV review by
Will Wade, Common Sense Media
Sci-Fi Science: Physics of the Impossible TV Poster Image
Look at far-out ideas could hook science-minded kids.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 9+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The show suggests that the impossible might not be quite as impossible as you think -- promoting curiosity and investigation.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Host Michio Kaku’s intellectual curiosity makes him an excellent host for this journey into advanced theoretical science. He understands the material and, even more importantly, can explain it to the average viewer. The result could make viewers eager to learn more about the subjects and perhaps guide them to careers in the sciences.

Violence

Some of the topics/issues explored (like light sabers) have the potential to be used as weapons.

Sex
Language
Consumerism

Host Michio Kaku has written several mainstream books on science and physics, and though they aren't mentioned on the show, the series does promote his work and his personal brand.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this series tries to find out whether some of the most amazingly far-out concepts and ideas from popular science fiction -- from time travel to parallel dimensions to how to build a functioning light saber -- could ever be turned into reality. Host/well-known theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku's explanations use some complex terms but are still accessible to older tweens and up (especially those with an interest in the subject matter). There’s no swearing, drinking, sex, or anything else to concern parents; instead, this is a show that might encourage further exploration of science.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 11 years old August 15, 2010

- -

Michio is a very creative and curious man, a person who reflects my personal bubble of imagination. To take fantasy and turn it into reality is something many o... Continue reading
Kid, 9 years old February 13, 2011

What's the story?

Theoretical physicist/best-selling author Dr. Michio Kaku makes far-out concepts approachable for everyday viewers as he shows how some of the most amazing ideas from popular science fiction could become reality. In SCI-FI SCIENCE: PHYSICS OF THE IMPOSSIBLE, Kaku explains advanced scientific theories and achievements and then extrapolates to demonstrate, for example, whether time-travel is possible, how people could visit parallel universes, and even how to build a working light saber.

Is it any good?

Kaku covers some very complicated ideas, but he makes them easy to understand. His low-key manner makes advanced physics both entertaining and approachable. Kaku also uses computer graphics and live demonstrations to explain various theories. The result is a fun look at some very far-out concepts that may not be nearly as far away as you might have thought. This is the kind of show that might even encourage people to study physics or consider a career in the sciences.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about science-fiction concepts. Do you think some of the ideas featured on this show could become reality? Did your perspective change after watching Kaku explain some of the advanced theories on the subject?

  • Does this series make you more interested in studying science? Do some topics seem less intimidating after watching Kaku explain them?

TV details

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For kids who love sci-fi

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