Shopkins

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Shopkins TV Poster Image
Cute toy-inspired shorts are heavily commercialized.

Parents say

age 5+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 13+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational value

The show intends to entertain rather than to educate.

 

Positive messages

Kids see the characters' friendly actions toward one another and the good-natured fun they have together. In some episodes, the Shopkins parody different TV genres (reality shows, documentaries, mysteries, etc.) in funny ways.

 

Positive role models & representations

On the whole the Shopkins are friendly, inclusive, and curious, which leads to many adventures in the store aisles.

 

Violence & scariness
Sexy stuff
Language
Consumerism

These 90-second featurettes star animated versions of popular Shopkins toys.

Drinking, drugs & smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Shopkins is a short-form series of 90-second episodes starring the inch-tall characters from the Shopkins collection of toys. The stories are clever and impressively efficient, given the show's time restrictions, and they have fun with their setting inside the grocery store where the characters live. Some parody reality TV, games shows, and other entertainment genres, and each one mixes up the featured cast, exposing viewers to most of the characters they will see on toy shelves. While the stories are harmless and more than a little cute, they excel even more at creating interest in the Shopkins product line.

User Reviews

Kid, 7 years old June 3, 2017

shopkins review

great but...WAY to much swearing and to much acting sexey
Teen, 17 years old Written byTheReviewee January 8, 2018

Do not buy the merchandise.

Moose Toys’ Shopkins shorts and toys are extremely annoying. The shorts are more like ads targeted at kids. What really frustrates me and the rest of my family... Continue reading

What's the story?

SHOPKINS is a series of animated shorts starring anthropomorphic grocery store items who live in a supermarket in Shopville. Each 90-second episode shows an assortment of the characters involved in a singular task inside the store, like climbing a freezer shelf or pondering what mysteries lie beyond the automatic doors. Though the characters are numerous, central figures include Apple Blossom, Strawberry Kiss, Kooky Cookie, and Lippy Lips.

Is it any good?

These webisodes are little more than extended commercials for the Shopkins figurines and accessories they represent, but they are fun, comical, and occasionally sweet. There's something oddly appealing about giving human characteristics to unlikely objects, and these fruits, veggies, and beauty products are no exception. It's a bonus that the stories are clever, usually with a fun spin on the supermarket setting and the unknown world beyond.

If your kids already know and like the Shopkins toys, there's no harm in giving them the OK on this cute short-form show. Seeing the characters' personalities might even inspire their own imaginative play as well. But if this is your kids' first introduction to the products, be forewarned that getting to know the characters is bound to draw their attention to the tiny replicas and accessories on your next stroll down the toy aisle.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the appeal of the Shopkins characters. Kids: Are you drawn to Shopkins toys? Does their miniature size make them more appealing or less? Why is it fun to see inanimate objects with human traits?

  • Kids: Do you have other favorite shows with accompanying toys? Does this kind of relationship influence what you're drawn to in the store?

  • Who are some of your kids' favorite TV characters? Are they based in fantasy, or are their realistic aspects to their stories? Are any good role models? If so, why?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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