Sorry for Your Loss

TV review by
Mark Dolan, Common Sense Media
Sorry for Your Loss TV Poster Image
Heavy drama explores themes of grief and depression.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Depicts an honest a decidedly un-romanticized view of coping with the death a loved one. The show highlights the social pressure put on people who are grieving to "get on with their lives." The message emphasized is that losing a loved one is extremely difficult and that everyone grieves at different pace. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

People care deeply for one another in this series. The show also has a refreshing outlook toward race. For example, Leigh and Matt being an interracial couple is not a plot point and the show doesn’t feel the need to explain why Leigh’s sister, Jules, is Asian.

Violence
Sex
Language

"Bitch," "s--t."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

One character is a recovering alcoholic and discusses her drinking openly;

What parents need to know

Parents need to know Sorry for Your Loss is a heavy drama centered around a young woman coping with the death of her husband. The show explores very mature themes including loss, depression, and substance abuse. Teens may know lead actress Elizabeth Olsen from The Avengers franchise but their interest in this overly serious story will depend on their patience with her sympathetic yet prickly character. This show is part of Facebook Watch, the social site’s foray into original streaming content and is readily accessible to anyone with a Facebook account.

 

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What's the story?

SORRY FOR YOUR LOSS focuses on Leigh, a widow in her twenties coping with the recent death of her husband, Matt. We meet Leigh three months after Matt’s death as she continues to grieve. She is understandably prickly and still emotionally fragile, which tries the patience of the people in her life who want her to move on. The death amplifies existing riffs Leigh has with her sister, a recovering alcoholic, and with Matt’s brother, Danny. Flashbacks give us glimpses into the couple’s life and the circumstances around how Matt actually died are unclear, but solving that mystery isn't a main driver of the plot. The emphasis here is on relationships and how Matt's death sends ripples through the lives of the people who were closest to him.

Is it any good?

This series should be applauded for its unflinching approach and its avoidance of cheap sentimentality or easy paths to redemption -- the death of a loved one is clearly one of the most delicate subjects a piece of drama can try to tackle. While Sorry for Your Loss is filled with strong actors --Elizabeth Olsen plays Leigh, Kelly Marie Tran (Star Wars: The Last Jediplays her sister, and Oscar nominee Janet McTeer play their mother -- there's something stilted about the dialogue that makes the intimacy of their relationships feel false. The writers so clearly want the characters’ conversations to sound natural and offhand that it comes across as exactly the opposite. It’s really too bad because the journey is compelling and show’s intentions are well meaning. If you like dark dramas and you're willing to face some cheesy dialogue, this show may be up your alley.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the loss of a loved one and how it can affect people differently. How do Leigh and Danny each cope with Matt’s death in Sorry for Your Loss?

  • A number of the characters accuse each other of making Matt's death all about themselves. Is a certain amount of selfishness just part of the grieving process?

TV details

For kids who love drama

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