Staten Island Cakes

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Staten Island Cakes TV Poster Image
Pastry chef + his boyfriend + family = fun reality recipe.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series promotes professionalism, creativity, and highlights the importance of family.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The family is close and is very supportive of Vinny Buzzetta’s career.

Violence

Mild family arguments are frequent, and often include snarky comments and yelling.

Sex

A 21st birthday party leads to some crazy antics, including some risqué pictures containing partially dressed folks (nudity is fully blurred). A Jersey Shore client requests a cake in the shape of a thong.

Language

Terms like “bust my balls” are audible, while curses like “s--t” are fully bleeped.

Consumerism

The series is a promotional vehicle for Buzzetta and his store, The Cake Artist. Most logos are blurred, but sometimes the Apple computer icon and other major brands are still recognizable. Occasionally local business logos and their products are visible.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Drinking (beer, wine, cocktails, hard liquor) is sometimes visible. One episode features a client that wants a beer-flavored cake. One episode features a birthday party that leads to overdrinking, wild partying, and hangovers. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this reality show’s major themes are business, family, and Vinny’s relationship with his boyfriend. It contains lots of family bickering (most of which is pretty mild), and occasional swearing (words like “s--t” are bleeped). Alcohol consumption (wine, cocktails, hard liquor, beer) is sometimes visible. The series is a promotional vehicle for The Cake Artist Bakery.

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What's the story?

STATEN ISLAND CAKES features pastry prodigy Vinny Buzzetta, the young owner of The Cake Artist, a Staten Island specialty bakery. When he’s not in the shop creating a new recipe or constructing a master cake for a client, he lives at home with his outspoken mom Cammy, sister Kristin, and little brother Robert. Life can get a little crazy, especially when Vinny’s dad Rob, his cousin Joe, and his eccentric grandfather, known as “Crazy Joe” to everyone who knows him, joins the fray. Luckily his boyfriend Spiro is around to help keep him calm. Mixing family drama and cake drama sometimes feels like a recipe for disaster, but Vinny’s love for both keeps everything going smoothly.

Is it any good?

The series offers a behind-the-scenes look the world of a talented up-and-coming pastry chef who owes much of his early success to the support of his family and culinary mentors. Vinny’s appreciation for this support, as well as his talent and commitment to his business, makes him very likable. Watching him design some interesting cakes is fun, too.

 

Even though the young cake artist seems more mature than the average 21 year old, he sometimes makes mistakes that require some mentoring from the more experienced adults around him. Like most young people, he occasionally likes to let off steam, which also leads to some crazy moments. But his overall love and respect for both his family and his profession makes you want him to succeed at any project he embarks on.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what goes into being a specialty baker. What kinds of training do bakers and pastry chefs need to have in order to be successful in their field? Is talent enough when considering opening up a bakery shop? Does this show offer a realistic view of what it takes to run a business of this kind? 

TV details

For kids who love reality television

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