Suddenly Royal

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Suddenly Royal TV Poster Image
Americans claim Brit throne in royally tedious reality.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Royal lineage doesn't equal luxury.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The Howes are likable; Drew can be silly.

Violence

People voice displeasure for the new king.

Sex

Some innuendo that will go over young kids' heads.

Language
Consumerism

Apple products visible. Logos covered.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Suddenly Royal is a reality series that shows what happens when an average blue-collar American family takes on its responsibilities as members of the British monarchy. It's pretty tame overall but contains a few moments of tension between adults and, on occasion, some innuendo that will fly over the heads of younger kids. There also are a fair number of Apple products visible, but the logos are conspicuously covered.

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What's the story?

SUDDENLY ROYAL is a reality series that shows what happens when an average blue-collar American family takes on its responsibilities as members of the British monarchy. David "Drew" Howe was living a happy life in Maryland as an auto service manager along with his wife, Pam, and daughter, Grace. But some online genealogical research revealed a surprise: Not only is Howe a direct descendant of King Henry VIII, but he's the last descendant of the kings of the Isle of Man and has a claim to the British protectorate's throne under British law. Years after making his claim and saving some money, King Drew, Queen Pam, and Princess Grace are finally traveling to the Isle of Man, located between Great Britain and Ireland, for six weeks to see what may await. With the help of a royal secretary, Lord Kevin Couling, they learn more about their responsibilities and how to behave. But it isn’t easy, especially when the locals are opposed to having a king.

Is it any good?

This tedious series attempts to offer a unique twist on a rags-to-riches story by showing how un-magical being a royal can be in today's times. The cast is genuinely likable, but most of their interaction seems completely orchestrated for the cameras.

Reality fans might find it fun, and you might capture a detail or two about the history and culture of the country they supposedly rule. But overall, the show's biggest accomplishment is making yet another U.S. citizen look silly in a foreign country.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the Isle of Man. What is its history? Would having a king affect the country in any way?

  • What does it mean to have "royal blood"? How can someone who lives in the U.S. have it? Could you be related to a royal family somewhere in the world? How can you find out?

TV details

For kids who love reality

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