Take My Wife

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Take My Wife TV Poster Image
Real-life comedy couple star in groundbreaking, funny show.

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The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Relationships and marriage are common themes. Stereotypes and discrimination are also discussed. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Cameron and Rhea are working hard to build a career in the male-dominated (and often heteronormative) world of comedy. 

Violence

Sexual assault is discussed in some episodes. Occasional images of people pretending to be dead (with fake blood). A couch is set on fire. The women sometimes get booed off stage. 

Sex

Some sexual behavior; couples are shown in bed together. Crude jokes are frequent. 

Language

Lots of strong cursing, ranging from "f--k" to "c--t." 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Occasional drinking.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Take My Wife is a comedy series about a married lesbian couple who work as stand-up comics. There’s lots of cursing, crude sexual references, and some sexual innuendo. There’s some fake violence, as well as references to sexual assault. Stereotypes and discrimination are discussed, as are subjects like marriage, having children, and other grown-up themes. Sometimes drinking is visible. 

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What's the story?

TAKE MY WIFE is a comedy series about the lives of a thirty-something married lesbian couple who host an underground stand-up comedy show together. Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher star as fictionalized versions of themselves as they work comedy circuit. Being stand-up comedians isn’t easy, especially when they have to come face to face with sexism, stereotypes, and rejection. Things don’t always go as expected, but throughout it all they have each other to rely on. 

Is it any good?

This sharp comedy series offers lots of laughs thanks to smart writing and a believable story world. Cameron Esposito and Rhea Butcher, who also write and produce the show, create relatable, humorous representations of themselves. The quirky cast of characters, played by funny folks like Zeke Nicholson and Laura Kightlinger, Clea Duvall, and musicians Tegan and Sara also add to the fun mix.

This series is groundbreaking, as it continues to heighten the visibility of the LGBTQ community on television. But Take My Wife has a broader appeal, thanks to the fact that it's as much about the challenges the characters face as struggling comedians as it is about their sexual orientation. Ultimately, it’s a fun, breezy show that's both funny and endearing.  

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what being a comedian is like. How do they prepare to go on stage? Do you think it would be hard to write jokes? 

  • What are some of the specific challenges women face in the world of stand-up comedy? Does Take My Wife do a good job of exploring these challenges?

  • Families can talk about using humor to talk about complex subjects. Do you think it's appropriate to address serious issues like stereotypes or sexual assault with humor? Why or why not? 

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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