Teamo Supremo

TV review by
Andrea Graham, Common Sense Media
Teamo Supremo TV Poster Image
Saving the world in the suburbs. Kids and up.

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 6+
Based on 5 reviews

A lot or a little?

Parents' guide to what's in this tv show.

Positive messages

Sends the message that kids can make a difference and encourages solving problems with smarts, not firepower. Also has good messages about friendship, justice, and teamwork.

Violence & scariness

Mild overall -- weapons are made out of toy jump ropes, yo-yos, marbles, etc.

Sexy stuff

Some very mild flirting between two characters with an innocent crush on each other.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, drugs & smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this cartoon features three preteen heroes who battle evil with intelligence and teamwork rather than superhero powers. The violence is mild for an action show; instead of guns and bombs, yo-yos, marbles, boomerangs, and jump-ropes double as weapons (which, of course, means younger kids may need to be reminded not to turn their own playthings into projectiles). The show offers strong messages about friendship, justice, and making sure you get your homework done.

User Reviews

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 15 years old Written bydanielauo January 14, 2010

Fun and colorful, all a kid wants.

OMG!! when I saw the picture it reminded me of when I was 7 years-old ! I loved that show. It's like Power Puff Girls.
Kid, 11 years old August 14, 2013

Cool Show!

Hey I Used To LOVE This Show! Celebrity Britney Spears Kinda reminds me of Rope Girl Because Rope Girl has a Southern Accent! Now I Think Of It There's T...

What's the story?

TEAMO SUPREMO follows the adventures of three extraordinary kids with ordinary powers. Teamo Supremo consists of three friends -- "Captain" Crandall (voiced by Spencer Breslin), Hector the "Skate Lad" (Alanna Ubach), and Brenda the "Rope Girl" (Ubach again) -- who defend their home town from evil ... after their homework is done, of course. In each episode, the team faces a wacky enemy in search of evil power; the list of zany baddies includes characters like biker dude Chopper Daddy, video game designer Paula Pixel, and Helius Inflato, who can inflate himself and fly. With their combined intelligence and teamwork, Teamo Supremo always manages to thwart the enemy's plans and save the day.

Is it any good?

Unlike a lot of other superhero cartoons, Teamo Supremo doesn't rely on graphic violence. Instead, toys double as weapons -- for example, Rope Girl uses her jump rope as a lasso to trip up and capture the bad guys. (Young viewers may need to be reminded not to do the same with their own toys. ...) There's also some occasional mild flirtation (nervousness, staring, etc.) between Crandall and Brenda, who have a harmless crush on each other.

Overall, Teamo Supremo is decent kids' entertainment. It takes an old formula and makes it new again by turning ordinary kids into suburban superheroes -- sending home the message that, superhero or not, kids can make a difference in their community.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the fact that the show's characters are kids who make a difference -- you can draw parallels about being a hero in your own community by volunteering. What does community involvement mean? How do even small efforts like picking up trash help the community? Where could you go to find information about volunteering?

TV details

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