The Capture

TV review by
Marty Brown, Common Sense Media
The Capture TV Poster Image
Clever military mystery thriller features violence, sex.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

As with many crime shows, the positive messages are murky, but people try to work for the greater good. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Supporting roles are diverse, but leads are white. The only Middle Eastern characters are portrayed as terrorists.

Violence

Violence is shown throughout: a soldier shoots an unarmed man in combat; a man assaults a woman on the street; a man resists arrest and gets tasered; etc.

Sex

Some sexual content, including many discussions of sex and a couple lying naked in bed together (with nudity obscured).

Language

Profanity is used throughout, including "f--k" and "s--t." 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Characters drink and use recreational marijuana, and frequently appear inebriated. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Capture is a mystery-suspense drama about military intelligence. It explores deceptively complex themes, including the manipulation and abuse of technology. The central mystery involves a soldier accused of war crimes and (separately) assaulting a woman. The show features frequent violence and some sexual content. Profanity is used throughout, including "f--k" and "s--t," and characters are shown drinking and smoking marijuana. Like other shows of its type, this one seems to feature stereotypical casting of Middle Eastern actors in terrorist roles.

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What's the story?

In THE CAPTURE, shortly after Lance Corporal Emery (Callum Turner) is acquitted of war crimes in the Middle East, a surveillance tape reveals him assaulting his lawyer on the street. DI Rachel Carey (Holliday Grainger), a careerist homicide detective, is assigned to the case. Everything seems fairly routine until Carey sees Emery react to the surveillance tape as if none of it happened, and believes him, leading her to wonder what could have really happened.

Is it any good?

Those looking for a challenging drama with surprising layers should be satisfied with this genre-upending mystery. An ambitious detective stumbles into a deceptively complex case that could put their whole career at risk -- it's a well-worn cliche in this era of television where every third show is a police procedural. Yet The Capture smartly uses the familiar framing device as a way to "Trojan horse" a complex and vital topic into its central mystery: How much can we trust technology? And what happens when that trust is manipulated for nefarious purposes? It's this sandwich of ideas that gives this series depth and unexpected nuance.  

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about The Capture's central mystery. What two crimes is Lance Corporal Emery accused of? What is the context? Why do you think so many shows revolve around mysteries?

  • How does The Capture portray technology? How can technology be manipulated? Do you see any parallels between the show and how technology is used in real life?

TV details

Our editors recommend

For kids who love drama TV

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