The Day My Butt Went Psycho

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
The Day My Butt Went Psycho TV Poster Image
Bizarre tales of boy and his bottom have meager messages.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 5 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show intends to entertain rather than educate. 

Positive Messages

The show is all about body humor, from the copious references to and images of butts to farts galore. Bottled farts are used as ammunition in fights. Lots of butt- and fart-related jokes. There are good guys and bad guys (along with their corresponding derrieres), the latter of whom scheme and plot in a quest for domination. That said, this buddy comedy has some heart, as Zack and Deuce learn time and again that they're better as a team than they are apart. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Zack has a goal in mind and a plan to achieve it. He and Deuce have an unorthodox relationship, but ultimately they're each other's better half. Eleanor is a fierce fighter who proves she can match wits with anyone. 

Violence & Scariness

Fight scenes show people (and butts) punching, squashing, and pounding on each other. There are violent crashes and painful collisions, but no one is worse for the wear for long. Guns shoot rolls of toilet paper and plungers as ammo. 

Sexy Stuff
Language

Lots and lots of uses of "butt."

Consumerism

This series is based on books by Andy Griffiths.  

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Day My Butt Went Psycho is set in a world where people and their animated, disembodied bottoms live side by side rather than as one. Based on a popular book series of the same name, the show relies on puns and jokes about butts and all things relative to garner laughs, so expect to hear plenty of references to farting as well. Violence is the other concern, as many scenes show the characters punching, flattening, and pummeling each other in the popular sport of "butt fighting." That said, the central characters (a boy and his butt) share a heartening relationship that weathers storms and usually brings out the best in both of them. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 6 and 9 year old Written byAV S August 20, 2017

Awful from the very top to the bottom

The stories are bizarre and over-simple, the music is annoying, the characters irritating and with no redeeming features. Wow, what a show...
Kid, 12 years old September 25, 2016
Kid, 9 years old September 30, 2015
It's about BUTTS people! Come on, expect farting and stuff. Well, yeah, I must admit it IS a little funny.

What's the story?

THE DAY MY BUTT WENT PSYCHO centers on a boy named Zack Freeman (voiced by Mac Heywood) and his newly separated -- and now willfully independent -- butt, Deuce (Rob Tinkler). In a world where people and their rear ends live side by side rather than conjoined, the modus operandi is a sport called "butt fighting," and it's Zack's deepest wish to master the skills and become the greatest butt fighter in the world. Together with his friend Eleanor (Bryn McAuley) -- who just happens to be the daughter of a legendary butt fighter, Silas Sterne (Kedar Brown), and a fierce battler herself -- Zack hones his skills in frequent face-offs with nefarious butts out to control the town. 

Is it any good?

The Day My Butt Went Psycho is eye candy for anyone with a 10-year-old's sense of humor, but it doesn't offer much depth beyond the seemingly endless bowels of toilet talk. This is a world where people and their walking, talking, preposterously oversized derrieres live side by side. Where conversations are rife with cleverly played puns about "explosive" altercations, "crack" fighting, and "cheeky" laughs. Where inanimate objects are reshaped into the now-distinctive image of a stand-alone tush. It's as if someone "cracked" open a kid's doodle pad and turned the contents into a cartoon, complete with gaseous weapons of mass expulsion.  

There is some merit to the buddy-comedy quality of the show, as Zack and Deuce come to realize that even though they're separate entities, they're better together than they are apart. Even so, that's not the reason kids will like it. When it comes to this age group, bathroom humor sells, and this outrageously silly series is as full-frontal (or back-frontal) in that department as a kid's cartoon can get. Ultimately this is a classic know-your-kid -- and know-your-own-tolerance level -- scenario. If yours are the type to repeat what they hear on TV and you're not keen on listening to butt and fart puns ad nauseam, you may want to turn their attention elsewhere. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about this show's unique brand of humor. Kids: Why is talking about butts and matters of the bathroom so funny? Are there times when such topics are more appropriate than others? 

  • What positive things does this show have to say about friendship? Do your kids like to be silly with their friends? What are some of their favorite pastimes?

  • Kids: Have you read the books that inspired this show? How do the two compare? What other books would you like to see turned into TV shows or movies? Have you ever been disappointed by how a book has turned out on the screen?

TV details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love silly humor

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate