The F Word with Gordon Ramsay

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
The F Word with Gordon Ramsay TV Poster Image
U.S. version of British cooking show is on the bland side.

Parents say

age 10+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Family, friends, and passion for food are themes.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Ramsay is supportive but can be brusque. 

Violence

Voices occasionally raised, but nothing major.

Sex

References to dating.

Language

"The F word" is food, but there's bleeped cursing (with blurred mouths). 

Consumerism

Guest celebs promote their own work. 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, cocktails served.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The F Word with Gordon Ramsay, the U.S. version of Britain's Gordon Ramsay's F Wordis a cooking competition that highlights teamwork and a passion for food (i.e., the "F word"). There's some bleeped cursing (mouths blurred) but not as much as many have come to expect from the show's host. On occasion there's some arguing. There's also alcohol (wine, cocktails) served throughout the show, and guest celebs often plug their own work. Teens might like it, but overall there's not a whole lot of kid appeal. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written bycharlie s. August 24, 2017

cover lots of ground in a short time

I love this show it has three celebrates coming in to talk or to do a funny bit. It has recorded braking stuff. It has jokes, pranks. Lots of real everyday peo... Continue reading

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What's the story?

Adapted from Gordon Ramsay's popular British series, THE F WORD WITH GORDON RAMSAY is a competition series featuring teams competing for money by cooking and serving signature dishes to be judged by diners. The live series features two teams of families or friends, each selected by Ramsay prior to the competition. During each episode, each team must cook for 25 diners and serve them creative and flavorful dishes. As they go through the process, Ramsay entertains dinner guests and TV audiences with prerecorded gags and live conversations with special guests such as Jamie Foxx and Snoop Dogg. After the service is over, all 50 dinner guests must decide whether or not they'd pay for the dishes they just ate in the future. The team that wins goes on to the next round of competition. The final episode features the top two teams facing off for a $100,000 cash prize. 

Is it any good?

This moderately entertaining cooking series highlights teamwork, family, friends, and food. However, most of it is committed to filling up live airtime while teams are preparing and serving meals in a studio restaurant, rather than detailing how dishes are being prepared. Gordon Ramsay checks in with teams at certain points, but the conversations are brief and often focus on things that needs to be improved. 

Like in the British version, Chef Ramsay does a lot of schmoozing, and the appearance of celebs (many of whom are promoting their own work) is designed to make the show more exciting. But the honest feedback from other diners, most of which isn't shown on camera, is much more interesting. Fans of the original may enjoy tuning in, but diehard foodies may not find The F Word with Gordon Ramsay seasoned well enough for their taste.  

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about cooking. Do you have to be a trained chef to make tasty, high-end food? What kinds of skills should cooks and chefs have that go beyond using knives and using appliances? Did The F Word with Gordon Ramsay inspire you to cook more?

  • Do you cook together with family or friends? Do you have signature dishes? Are they good enough to serve on a show like The F Word with Gordon Ramsay? If not, what would it take to get those dishes to that next level? 

  • What are the challenges that come with showing a TV show live? What if things go wrong while on the air? How do time zones affect whether or not viewers get to watch as things are actually happening?

TV details

For kids who love cooking

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