The Gorburger Show

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
The Gorburger Show TV Poster Image
Surreal, monster-hosted chat show brings scattered laughs.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Everyone's pretty much just being ironic and wacky for the sake of being ironic and wacky.

Positive Role Models & Representations

The host is a murderous extraterrestrial puppet. Worse yet, he's unfunny.

Violence

Frequent cartoonish on-screen deaths and dismemberments. A man's face is stuck to a hot grill. A man is hanged by his own necktie; in another episode he's impaled on an oversized butcher knife. The show's namesake monster rips off people's faces (it looks extremely fake).

Sex

Some graphic references to pornography ("squirting" is mentioned); a guest makes out with a mannequin. One episode features a visit to a sex doll factory.

Language

"Holy s--t," "pissed," "hell," "damn."

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Some references to, jokes about vaping.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Gorburger Show is a parody of traditional talk shows, hosted by a furry blue alien character voiced by T.J. Miller (Silicon Valley). Real celebrities appear (Andy DickRob CorddryTig Notaro). Though the host may appear to be a somewhat cuddly, weird-looking monster, he's portrayed as sleazy and violent. Gorburger is a somewhat ignorant alien, and he grills his human guests on the habits and traditions of earthlings. There are some crass and repetitive sexual references, and someone seems to die in every episode. The sexuality and violence are played for laughs, but parents may or may not find this style of humor appropriate.

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What's the story?

Gorburger is a huge blue alien who beams his way onto the set of a zany Japanese variety show, quickly slaughtering the hosts and turning the rest of the cast into his servants on THE GORBURGER SHOW. Having installed himself as the program's de facto host, the troublemaking extraterrestrial goes about interviewing celebrities, announcing various musical guests (including Big Freedia and Danny Brown), and occasionally taking out-of-studio excursions to places like a sex doll factory and a junkyard. The basic format is exactly like a real talk show, just weirder (which is very much on purpose) and with more bloodshed.

Is it any good?

This series certainly looks different, with its colorfully cartoonish visuals and, of course, the oversized puppet host -- but the content itself is pretty unremarkable and trying so hard to be "different" that it's painful. Fans of absurdist humor and lowbrow hijinks have seen the talk show parody thing done before -- and to better effect; Eric Andre practically invented the genre, at least for the millennial crowd. Being random for random's sake, putting on a funny voice, and showing puppets behaving badly really isn't anything new these days (see also: Wonder Showzen, Tim and Eric), so if you're going to do it, the material better be up to snuff. Unfortunately, the purposefully awkward chitchat and wannabe wacky segment pieces aim for bizarrely entertaining but miss the mark more often than not, and The Gorburger Show's over-the-top trappings aren't enough to hide the show's lack of comedic spark.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the different guests who appear on The Gorburger Show. Which were your favorites, and who seemed to gel best with the show's unconventional host and format?

  • How does this show compare to other, more traditional talk shows? How does it parody the format?

TV details

For kids who love comedy

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