The Legend of Tarzan

TV review by
Andrea Graham, Common Sense Media
The Legend of Tarzan TV Poster Image
The Lord of the Jungle has his hands full.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 5+
Based on 3 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Responsibilites are often both challenging and rewarding.

Violence & Scariness

Some hunters/poachers cary guns.

Sexy Stuff

Tarzan and Jane learn to live as a happily (and, since it's Disney, chastely) married couple. Tarzan never wears much in the way of clothes.

Language
Consumerism

Disney is always tied to merchandise.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this jungle-set cartoon is based on the Disney film Tarzan -- which, in turn, was based on the classic 1914 novel Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The series, which has very little objectionable content, continues where the film left off, focusing on themes such as growing up, responsibility, and leadership.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 11 years old April 9, 2008

hi

its an ok show.
Teen, 13 years old Written byrebma97 February 25, 2011

Ok spinoff

It's an alright show. But it's still entertaining. Violence: From what I remember, mild peril, no fighting really. Sex: Jane and Tarzan are a couple,... Continue reading

What's the story?

THE LEGEND OF TARZAN picks up where Disney's animated feature film Tarzan left off, following Tarzan (voiced by Michael T. Weiss) and Jane (Olivia d'Abo) as they build their new life together among Tarzan's ape family and community. Of course, the honeymoon doesn't last very long, as Jane and Tarzan have to learn to understand each other's ways: Tarzan encourages Jane to loosen up her sensibilities, while Jane, in turn, teaches her husband to act like a civilized human and adult. Marital challenges aside, Tarzan has a few real enemies to deal with, including greedy importer Renard Dumont (Rene Auberjonois) and Tublat (Keith David), a devious gorilla intent on bringing Tarzan down. But no matter what challenges Tarzan has to face, with the support of his friends and family, he successfully solves both problems large and small, reinforcing the idea that it really does take a village sometimes.

Is it any good?

Despite the show's charms, it doesn't quite live up to the original film. But it does teach viewers about the responsibilities of growing up -- the good, the bad, and, of course, the funny -- and it's definitely something that families can watch together, especially as it spends a lot of time focusing on family dynamics.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how Tarzan deals with his many responsibilities. As he adjusts to his new roles as husband and ape leader, families can discuss the challenges and frustrations of his new life. Have kids ever felt overwhelmed by the responsibilities that growing up demands? How did they learn to adjust? Why do responsibilities change as you grow up? What are some rewards and challenges that go along with growing up?

TV details

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