The New Adventures of Old Christine

TV review by
S. Jhoanna Robledo, Common Sense Media
The New Adventures of Old Christine TV Poster Image
A "family show" that's not for kids.

Parents say

age 15+
Based on 9 reviews

Kids say

age 11+
Based on 4 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Stay-at-home moms are pitted against working moms; exes do their best to navigate separate lives, but it sometimes gets messy; a divorcee does the best that she can to remake herself.

Violence
Sex

Though there's no nudity, sex is referenced within the first 10 minutes of the first episode, and constantly in subsequent episodes.

Language

Pretty tame ("damn," "hell").

Consumerism

Nothing excessive (though the son occasionally plays GameBoy).

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Christine and friends occasionally have a glass of wine.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that although Christine spends plenty of heartwarming moments with her third-grader, this sitcom isn't really about parenting. It's actually more adult, dealing humorously with such issues as how middle-class types mingle with their super-rich counterparts, how women size each other up, and how ex-spouses move on and move up in the world.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byyuri13 September 29, 2014

It's not SOOOOOOOOOO... inappropriate

some sexual references,language and drinking.If Were a movie,will be rated:PG-13
Parent of a 10 year old Written bySTEPcoach October 29, 2010

Good adult fun - not for kids

While this comedy is not suitable for kids under the age of 15 -16, for adults, and especially divorced parents, there are some positive messages here. Christin... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byLillliiiaaannn October 27, 2013

Best Show Ever!

This show is hilarious and no harm is done if you're mature enough.
Kid, 12 years old August 20, 2009

Funny

Pretty good family sitcom, despite the sex references.

What's the story?

THE NEW ADVENTURES OF OLD CHRISTINE stars Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Christine, a woman who owns a Curves-type gym franchise and is trying to forge an identity beyond that of mother and ex-wife. Endearing and insecure, Christine struggles with life as a single mother after her son starts attending a new, more exclusive school and her ex takes on a younger, spacier Christine (yes, they share the same name, which is why Louis-Dreyfus' character is the "old" Christine). Her ex, Richard (Clark Gregg), is cavalier about having a new girlfriend; Christine's co-worker gets all the witty one-liners; and her roommate (her brother) is slacker-snarky, ever the observer.

Is it any good?

In the able hands of Louis-Dreyfus, Christine sometimes manages to be complex, but only for a moment, until she's drowned out by the ubiquitous laugh track. All too quickly, the show falls into stereotypes -- the rich-stay-at-home moms are brittle and bitter; the new girlfriend is pretty, and pretty vapid -- but the intended irony may not be clear, especially to young viewers. Instead, they may think new girlfriends of divorced fathers are usually vacuous (and good in bed, if inferences are to be believed); that divorced moms are frantic and sex-starved (one episode mentions "sex" so many times that nothing else seems important); and that children of divorce suffer only from a severe case of flatly written dialogue.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what happens when a nuclear family detonates, and what the fall-out is for both parents and children. How can families survive divorce? What's it like for kids? They can also explore questions of race and class, both of which are brought up in the episodes that deal with Christine's son switch from public to private school. Is it easy to start over? How does one begin again?

TV details

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate