The New Yorker Presents

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
The New Yorker Presents TV Poster Image
Iconic magazine successfully puts content in video form.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Social issues, arts, culture are explored with a keen eye. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Acclaimed artists and professionals are profiled. Stories about people, good and not-so-good.

Violence

Works explore racial violence, 9/11, guns, wrestling, death, and so on.

Sex

Strong innuendo; nudity (as art). A person shown urinating.

Language

Curses such as "f--k" and "s--t."

Consumerism

Restaurant, chefs, cities featured. It's a promotion for the New Yorker magazine.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, cocktails sometimes featured. References to meth labs, drug use, addiction.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The New Yorker Presents is a series based on the award-winning publication of the same name. It explores issues ranging from race-related violence and guns to the work of painters, chefs, performers, and more. There's some sexual innuendo, nudity, and cursing, but all this is offered within the context of the artistic or literary work being interpreted for the camera. Older teens who like intellectually oriented or art-house-style works will be interested, but much of what is featured here probably won't appeal to younger kids.

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What's the story?

Based on the content of the renowned New Yorker magazine, THE NEW YORKER PRESENTS is a unique series that brings to life many of the literary and artistic works featured in the magazine over the years. Each 30-minute installment offers short films and documentaries, and readings of literary works created by critically acclaimed filmmakers, writers, and artists. Sketches starring actors such as Alan Cumming and Paul Giamatti and the work of Roz Chast and other cartoonists published in the magazine are also featured.

Is it any good?

The series offers a visual cornucopia of narratives, all of which say something about political and social issues, arts, and culture in America. Giving it much of its richness are the in-depth profiles of people it has spotlighted, including renowned performance artist Marina Abramović, underground Los Angeles chef Craig Thornton, and Cassandro, a gay star of Mexican lucha libre wrestling.

Some of the selections are delightfully entertaining, while other works will leave you thinking more about the world around you and the people in it. No doubt that fans of the magazine will enjoy the visual interpretations of the literary articles and modern fiction they've read over the years, but you don't have to be a reader to appreciate the amount of delicious food for thought it offers.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the New Yorker magazine. Did you know this magazine has been in circulation since 1925? Even though it focuses on life in New York City, what makes it popular with audiences across America?

  • Is it possible to make a film or documentary based on a written story or interview and not make changes to the story? Why, or why not? 

TV details

For kids who love literary fun

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