The Real Housewives of Cheshire

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
The Real Housewives of Cheshire TV Poster Image
Across-the-pond spin-off has same drama, different accents.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Money, social status is everything.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Women are narcissistic, materialistic. 

Violence

Endless arguments, yelling.

Sex

Cast members admit to sexually exploiting men; crude sexual references.

Language

"Piss," "tits," "bitch"; bleeped curses.

Consumerism

Gucci, HP computers, Apple products, Infiniti cars.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Lots of champagne, wine, hard liquor; drunken behavior.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The Real Housewives of Cheshire, as with most installments of the Real Housewives reality franchise, features lots of the over-the-top drama it's known for. There's lots of arguing, strong language ("piss," "t-ts," "bitch"; bleeped curses), crude sexual references, and lots of drinking and drunken behavior.

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What's the story?

THE REAL HOUSEWIVES OF CHESHIRE is a reality series about a group of privileged women living in the wealthy town of Chelsea, England. It stars interior designer Dawn Ward and members of the Chelsea circle, including Lauren Simon and Leanne Brown. Also hanging out out with them are salon owner Ampika Pickston and Tanya Bardsley, who's moving back to town after being away for a few years. Also featured is Magali Gorré, who seems to be the odd one out. From shopping to salon visits, the group makes the most of living in a town that caters to the wealthy.

Is it any good?

This British Real Housewives spinoff follows the narcissistic, self-indulgent, and dramatic formula the franchise is known for and repeats it with reasonable success in England. Each episode features the cast of women (most of whom are wealthy thanks to their soccer-playing husbands) talking about their social positions, decorating their estates, spending their families' money, and, of course, arguing with each other.

The endless drama about seemingly superficial issues makes it hard to remember that these women are mothers and, in some cases, professionals. Luckily, the overall series isn't meant to be taken seriously. If you're looking for a show that lacks substance but has some style, you won't be disappointed.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the appeal of the Real Housewives. Why is this reality franchise so popular? 

  • Do you think the way the cast appears and behaves on camera is in line with who they are when the cameras are off? Are there differences between the values presented in the American versions of the series versus the British ones?

TV details

For kids who love reality TV

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