The White Princess

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
The White Princess TV Poster Image
Post-War of the Roses tale has strong sexual material.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 3 reviews

Kids say

age 15+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Continual struggles for power make people (especially women) political pawns. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Men and women seek to gain, maintain power in different ways.

Violence

Battle scenes, stabbings, killings. Frightening, bloody images. threats. A threat of rape.

Sex

Strong sexual innuendo, simulated sex scenes, nudity (breasts, buttocks).  

Language

Some crude language, cursing. 

Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Wine, ale consumed. 

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that The White Princess is a historical drama about the rise of the Tudor dynasty. This sequel to The White Queen is based on Philippa Gregory's novel and contains lots of mature content, including simulated sex acts, threats of rape, violent battles, poisoning, and killing. Witchcraft is also shown. There's drinking (wine, ale), and occasional crude language and cursing.  

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byBrad T May 21, 2017

Revisionist history is BS

Whether or not it follows the book is secondary to me. As one who studied British History, at length, in college, it's premise is ridiculous. First, Henr... Continue reading
Adult Written byChrista T. May 21, 2017
Teen, 15 years old Written bykingsebby1057 May 4, 2017

Historical piece that is very honest and stays true to the book

The white princess is an amazing show it also shows how powerful women are and has strong feminist message overall the show is amazing and takes takes very big... Continue reading
Teen, 16 years old Written byBellaNic April 24, 2018

The best show on Starz

This show is very good and not as inappropriate as most starz shows.

What's the story?

Based on the Philippa Gregory novel of the same name, THE WHITE PRINCESS tells the story of the marriage between Elizabeth of York (Jodie Comer) and King Henry VII (Jacob Collins-Levy). Edward III, the last of the Plantagenet kings, has died in the 1485 Battle of Bosworth. Now the White Queen's daughter and the late King's lover, Elizabeth of York, is now forced to marry Henry VII, the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. In doing so, she must also contend with His Majesty’s mother, Margaret Beaufort (Michelle Fairley), who was instrumental in placing Henry on the throne, and remains a powerful force at court. Meanwhile, the Dowager Queen Elizabeth (Essie Davis), works from behind the scenes to empower her daughter while secretly supporting those who may threaten Henry VII’s crown in the future. 

Is it any good?

The soap opera-ish series offers a romanticized version of the relationship between the first Tudor King and Queen of England. It features all the machinations and struggles for power and influence for which the English royal court is known for, but it does so with the fictional flair of Philippa Gregory’s book series rather than with historical accuracy. However, at times it presents Elizabeth as a stronger, more empowered figure than she is in the book, allowing her character to rise above her role as a mere political pawn who settles into her role. 

Although it's a follow-up to The White Queen, the cast changes and post-War of the Roses narratives of this mini-series give it a very different feel. However, the insertion of fictional characters and plots to add to the turmoil doesn't take away from the show's historical foundation, which contextualizes the difficult role Elizabeth of York had to play as a result of her noble birth. If you like British royal history dramas (and there are quite a few to choose from at this point), The White Princess will prove itself very entertaining. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about historical dramas on TV. Are they more factual or fictional? Does it matter? How true to life is The White Princess?

  • Marriage and mistresses form part of British monarchial history. As a result, some history-themed dramas like The White Princess contain lots of strong sexual material. Could they tell the same story without being so explicit?

TV details

For kids who love historical TV

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