Tom Green's House Tonight

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Tom Green's House Tonight TV Poster Image
Odd online show brims with crass talk, sexual content.

Parents say

age 16+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series contains lots of questionable behavior and sexist remarks. However, it does contain some positive messages about supporting cancer causes and supporting celebrity efforts to stay clean and sober. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Tom Green's humor is often silly, crass, and at times incorporates sexist jokes and metaphors. Green actively discourages racist jokes on his show.

Violence
Sex

Women are often referred to as “chicks." Words like “nips,” “nuts,” “balls,” and “bush” are used to describe body parts. Nudity is sometimes visible, including women's genital areas. Green occasionally references his battle with testicular cancer. Bathroom humor (references to farts, etc.) is frequent.

Language

Contains strong language, including words like “hell,” “piss,”  “douche bag,” “dick,” “f--k,” and “s--t.”

Consumerism

Beverages like Coca Cola products and Glaceau Vitamin Water bottles are visible, but labels are not prominently featured. YouTube videos are sometimes shown. Guests often promote their new shows and films. Skype video calling is featured. Full versions of Green’s show are only available to paying members of his online entertainment service, The Channel.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Contains constant references to drinking and getting drunk; drinking is sometimes visible. Occasional video calls feature people smoking. Guests talk about recovering from drug/alcohol addiction.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this online series might be popular with Tom Green fans, especially teen boys, but due to its strong language and sexual references, is best left to older teens. The show's bad language  includes “hell,” “piss,” “dick,” “f--k,” “s--t”, as well as occasional nudity (including pictures of women's crotches), and lots of sexual innuendo (including words like “nips,” “nuts,” “balls,” and “bush”) to describe body parts. Bathroom humor is also used. In-studio and video call-in guests are sometimes shown smoking cigarettes, and guests drink alcohol frequently. Coca Cola and other commercial products are sometimes visible.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 3 and 5 year old Written bySierra Filucci March 9, 2010

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What's the story?

TOM GREEN’S HOUSE TONIGHT is an Internet-based talk show hosted by comedian Tom Green. Green showcases his unique brand of humor while conducting interviews with celebrities from his Los Angeles home studio. The unscripted series often features silly stunts, as well as YouTube videos of some of Green’s crazy antics. The host also takes video calls from viewers, and interacts with the show’s small studio audience.

Is it any good?

The series offers an interesting alternative to the traditional variety talk show thanks to its use of Internet technology and a low-budget and spontaneous production style. Technical glitches and unexpected prank calls also form part of the fray. Green, who proudly refers to his show as “Web-O-Vision,” does not stream the show on a regular basis, thus making the act of watching it somewhat of a novelty.

Unlike the syndicated television version of this series (which aired from 2008-2009), Green’s online show features lots of unrestrained conversations that contain strong language and over-the-top sexual innuendo. Despite the appearance of some big name celebrities, including Jimmy Kimmel, Brooke Shields, and Rob Schneider, some folks may find the endless banter a little boring. But loyal Tom Green fans will still find it worth watching.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about what it takes to create a successful online series. Why do you think Tom Green’s show is so popular? Do you think just anyone can produce a successful online entertainment show?

  • Online programming often features stronger content than television programs. Why? Do you think this is a good thing, or a bad thing? Does online programming allow people to be more creative and innovative, or just more silly and/or inappropriate? Parents: Check out some information, tips, and advice on navigating the digital world with your kids.

TV details

For kids who love funny stuff

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