Tut

TV review by
Kari Croop, Common Sense Media
Tut TV Poster Image
Bloody, sexy Egyptian epic mixes facts and fiction.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 17+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

Betrayal and political treachery are major themes, but so are duty, honor, and ambition. Thanks to history, the king's fate is inevitable.

Positive Role Models & Representations

Featured women generally play a secondary role to their male counterparts, and characters have both good and bad sides.

Violence

Extended battle scenes show stabbing, gouging, severed limbs, and spurting blood. Characters use a variety of weapons, from spears and swords to bows and arrows.

Sex

Simulated sex with partial nudity (bare backs, tops of buttocks, sides of breasts) and explicit thrusting. Incest is implied in Tut's marriage to his half-sister; rape is mentioned.

Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Social drinking; some drunkenness.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Tut is partially rooted in fact but, as in many bio-driven dramas, takes some liberties with historical accuracy. Battles tend toward the epic and bloody, with characters wielding a variety of weapons -- from swords and spears to bows and arrows -- and some downright gruesome visuals, including a graphic impalement. You'll also see simulated sex that doesn't technically show sensitive parts (other than the tops of buttocks or the curves of breasts) but leaves very little to the imagination. Characters drink socially.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

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Kid, 8 years old August 4, 2015

Bloody romen TV thriller is very violent but thrilling and racy.

This show fallows King Tut 10 years after his father was poisoned. This drama has tons violence including moments of extreme gore,blood splatters; a man is slic... Continue reading

What's the story?

Structured as a three-part miniseries, TUT chronicles the short but dramatic life of King Tutankhamun (Avan Jogia), one of Egypt's most famous -- and enduringly fascinating -- pharaohs. In the wake of his father's death, young Tut ascends the throne, marries his half-sister (Sibylla Deen), and comes of age under the watchful eye of his father's adviser (Ben Kingsley). But Tut's reign is soon threatened by those who wish to betray him, including those he once trusted the most.

Is it any good?

Nobody's expecting the Spike network -- a cable channel that has traditionally catered to adult men with shows such as Ink Master, Half Pint Brawlers and Deadliest Warrior -- to be a pillar of historical accuracy. But Tut at least signifies an attempt to attract a broader audience beyond fans of, say, mixed martial-arts fighting and SpongeBob SquarePants reruns with a respectable TV epic that gets a lot of things right about King Tut's reign.

Though it might have worked well as a full-order drama, Tut definitely plays better as a three-part miniseries, pooling its resources into three long episodes that explore the intricacies of politics and power but pack a wallop when it comes to violence and sex. That translates into television that's technically rated TV-14 yet comes as close as you can get to being explicit, so teens will get an eyeful along with any education.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about Tut's treatment of Egyptian history. How important is accuracy when dramatizing the life of a historical figure? What are the risks of taking liberties with the truth? How does Tut's King Tutankhamun compare with the real-life pharaoh?

  • How are women portrayed on Tut compared to men? Who has more power, and why?

  • Who is Tut's target audience, and how can you tell?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love history

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