Two More Eggs

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Two More Eggs TV Poster Image
Creative animation gives quirky, madcap shorts appeal.

Parents say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 2 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show intends to entertain rather than to educate. 

Positive Messages

The shorts are generally nonsensical and light on plot, but their animation is creative, and they're just goofy enough that they still entertain. Exaggerated physical features, speech patterns, and personal habits are mined for laughs. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The characters are created for comic effect, so their flaws are exaggerated on purpose. None can be said to be a great role model, in part because the stories' short format doesn't allow for much plot development.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Two More Eggs is a series of quirky shorts from the creative minds behind the early 2000's Internet sensation Homestar Runner. The content is utterly nonsensical, but it's equally engaging and fun to watch. There's nothing iffy about the show, but its humor is more in line with the life experiences of teens and tweens than it is with those of younger kids. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byJessrond October 13, 2017

Harmless but not as good as Homestar Runner

There are probably six or seven completely unrelated cartoons under the "Two More Eggs" title. None of them are hilarious but they are amusing. This i... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byTiger827 August 8, 2016

Another useless thing in our world

• NO Story • Bad Animation • Boring and Dumb
Teen, 13 years old Written bySpacething7474 January 8, 2018

I hope this was renewed.

This show is hilarious. Like Billy Dilley, Future-Worm!, and Right Now Kapow!, it is a fun show that is pushed over for garbage like Star Vs. or Ducktales 2017.... Continue reading

What's the story?

TWO MORE EGGS is a short-form series from the Brothers Chaps, whose animated Internet hit Homestar Runner became a cult phenomenon among teens. The show uses a variety of animation styles and introduces characters such as video game minions and a mom who shares obscure meal hacks, as well as commercial spoofs and comical how-to's. 

Is it any good?

These minute-long shorts are fluffy and nonsensical, but that doesn't make them any less fun to watch. Between the range of bizarre characters and obscure scenarios, Two More Eggs always feels fresh, and its comic sense is oddly addictive. What's more, there's real appeal to the show's use of different animation styles, giving the project the feel of a drawing-board experiment gone very right.

Don't expect to be knocked over by the show's content; to call it brain candy is generous. But its abbreviated format affords it some leniency in that department, and the visual creativity is a treat. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about this show's unique animation. Why do you think the creators incorporated such variety rather than settling on one style? 

  • Which of the characters do you find the funniest? Often the best humor has a grain of truth to it. Is that the case with these characters' idiosyncrasies? What else accounts for the laughs the show gets? 

  • Kids: Do you often go on the Internet to watch shows? Which sites do you frequent? Do you notice general differences between Web shows and TV ones?

TV details

Themes & Topics

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For kids who love quirky animation

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