Unikitty!

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
Unikitty! TV Poster Image
Fantasy, creativity abound in fast-paced animated series.
Popular with kids

Parents say

age 8+
Based on 13 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 22 reviews

We think this TV show stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

Intends to entertain rather than to educate.

Positive Messages

Unikitty and her friends generally find that teamwork yields better results than going solo, and her compassion makes her a loyal friend. Even so, in her quest to make everyone happy all the time, she comes to see that counter emotions like sadness and anger cannot be avoided altogether. The show's cast populates a creative, fantastical world that young viewers will like. Violence of some sort often is the only means to an end.

 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Unikitty's motivations are good, and she puts great effort into making everyone happy, but she's most successful when she and her friends realize that perfection isn't a realistic goal. When their efforts to achieve it fail, they accept reality and make the best of it.

 

Violence & Scariness

Flashy action sequences show the characters punching, hitting, and kicking their way out of (and sometimes into) trouble. Explosions are common, and some machines fire what looks like bullets. Injuries are limited to some bumps and bruises.

 

Sexy Stuff
Language

Rarely name-calling like "jerk" and battle talk like "kick that booty."

 

Consumerism

This series is inspired by The Lego Movie, which first introduced Unikitty's character.

 

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Unikitty! is an animated series about the character fans first met in The Lego Movie. Here Unikitty and her world are animated in 2D fashion rather than in the 3D style of the Lego movies, and her fantasy-filled kingdom is a place of creativity and fantasy that kids will like. The stories center mostly on Unikitty's efforts to keep her friends and subjects happy, despite the negative influences of an assortment of villains. Expect lots of absurdity, outlandish scenarios, and oddball characters. There's some violence, but it's mostly unrealistic and results in only minor injuries.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of an infant year old Written byHolly R. February 6, 2018

Most energetic cartoon I've seen in a while

It's fast paced and hyper sounding. Characters are loud and obnoxious but yet it still manages to not only be watchable, it manages to actually get me to l... Continue reading
Adult Written byCorina M. March 20, 2018

They shouldn’t laugh at depression.

So I just watched an episode of unikitty called film fest where the whole episode they try to keep from playing Richards film because they think it will be ter... Continue reading
Teen, 13 years old Written byLadyXtheKnight January 7, 2018

I love this show!

It's adorable, has messages of friendship and teamwork, and is great overall. The violence is nothing more than comical fights that result in little to no... Continue reading
Kid, 11 years old January 9, 2018

Very great show

Im 11 and a boy but i still love it

What's the story?

UNIKITTY! centers on Princess Unikitty (voiced by Tara Strong), who bears responsibility for her subjects' happiness and seeks out opportunities to ensure it. She and her cadre -- her brother, Puppycorn (voiced by Grey DeLisle); resident tech expert, Dr. Fox (Kate Micucci); martial arts expert Hawkodile (Roger Craig Smith); and Richard (Smith again), her monotone-speaking and oft-ignored advisor -- keep tabs on the kingdom from Unikitty's castle and intervene to banish negativity spread by Master Frown (Eric Bauza) and other villains as needed. But don't let her sunny disposition fool you; Unikitty can get fierce when things don't go her way.

Is it any good?

A breakout star from The Lego Movie, this unicorn/cat hybrid spreads her figurative wings in her own series that's a noticeable visual departure from her blocky beginnings. Episodes open with two Lego characters settling in to watch Unikitty's adventures, but that's the only bridge between the two productions. The series veers off in bold 2D animation with characters and settings that bear no resemblance to Lego whatsoever, save for the dull gray, easily overshadowed brick named Richard.

Of course, if you have no particular allegiance to Unikitty's origin story, then it's easy to pick up with her misadventures as this series gets off the ground. The stories aren't hard to follow -- Unikitty and her friends identify a threat to either their or the general population's happiness and set out to defeat it -- and they're colorful and fast-paced throughout. Creativity abounds in Unikitty's world of unusual creatures and bizarre happenings, and what violence exists is fantastical and a minor concern for the show's target audience of kids and young tweens.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the appeal of shows like Unikitty! versus others more grounded in reality. In what ways is entertainment a departure from real life? Is it important to you that the shows you watch and characters you enjoy be somewhat relatable, or do you like the fantasy of it all?

  • How do Unikitty and her friends show their compassion for others around them? Why do you think it's an important character strength? Does Unikitty care because she has to (she is the princess, after all) or because she wants to? What kinds of outreach projects do you care most about?

  • If you've seen The Lego Movie, talk about whether or not this series is what you expected from Unikitty's character. Why do you think the show's creators designed Unikitty and her surroundings as they did? Is it hard for you to follow a character or a story that undergoes drastic visual or plot changes?

TV details

Character Strengths

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Themes & Topics

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For kids who love animated fun

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