Unwrapped

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Unwrapped TV Poster Image
Get the skinny on classic snacks and goodies.

Parents say

age 2+
Based on 2 reviews

Kids say

age 5+
Based on 7 reviews

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series offers informative explanations about how various food products are created and mass produced throughout the United States. It features many products that have become part of American popular culture.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Features many popular product brand names like Pringles, See's Candies, Astro Pops, Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Crackers, Cracker Jacks, Cocoa Puffs, Kool Aid, and Campbell's Soup. Also features regional product brands and small businesses. Summers will say if items are available in stores or online but doesn't provide specific ordering information.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Occasionally beer, wine, or liquor is part of a recipe and is shown being poured into mixing barrels.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this educational series -- which examines how popular food items are made -- references plenty of familiar brand names, from Cocoa Puffs to Kool Aid, that are part of American popular culture. While the series is a fine choice for kids who are curious about how things are made, this subtle brand promotion often highlights the animated characters (like Tony the Tiger) associated with these products. Also, given the show's focus on "goodies" like cookies and candy, watching could leave kids craving stuff you'd rather they didn't.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byRecessGymClass2 December 2, 2016

One of my favorite shows.

I LOVE to see how things are made. This show is so cool. I watch it a lot, and I just think it is amazing. Recommended for everyone.
Adult Written bynoelandjillian April 9, 2008
Kid, 12 years old October 19, 2009

Nice and fun!

Love it! I was the science kid so it makes sense, But it is fun and is great in making food, and is a family favourite!
Kid, 12 years old April 9, 2008

What's the story?

UNWRAPPED is a fun, informative series that goes behind the scenes to reveal how classic American food favorites are made. Hosted by Marc Summers, the show explores the factories and kitchens that turn out some of the nation's favorite candies, cookies, and other packaged goodies. Though careful not to reveal recipe secrets, manufacturing representatives explain what goes into their products. From potato chips to popsicles, viewers watch as ingredients are mixed and foods are frozen, cooked, cooled, wrapped, and boxed. Often, the history behind the product is also touched on, explaining how these foods have become part of American popular culture.

Is it any good?

Unwrapped is fun way to learn about how popular snacks are made. But because the show focuses on specific product brands -- and includes enthusiastic endorsements by company reps and die-hard collectors -- it sometimes sounds a bit like an infomercial. Still, the simple explanations give viewers young and old a chance to learn about what goes into some of the foods they love the best. (Just be sure to have some healthy snacks on hand for when you're done watching and have the urge to nibble...).

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about how the media can sometimes blur the lines between educating the public about something and promoting it. How can shows avoid endorsing products and services that they want to inform viewers about? Does seeing a product on TV make you more likely to want it? What's the downside of eating too much of the types of foods and other products profiled on this show? Families can also discuss some of their favorite classic foods. What things do you like to eat that make you wonder how it was made?

TV details

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