Parent reviews for Victoria

Victoria Poster Image

Common Sense says

age 13+

Based on our expert review

Parents say

age 13+

Based on 9 reviews

Kids say

age 12+

Based on 8 reviews

age 12+

Boring

The show is not suitable for any one because characters are not suited for the roles. This is a major backlash.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much consumerism
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 16+

Boring

I believe that storyline is not engaging for the audience meaning boring to watch. Does not follow the old traditional and characters some don’t suit their roles.

This title has:

Too much violence
Too much sex
Too much swearing
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 10+

Fantastic Period Drama

Victoria is one of the best period pieces I've seen in awhile. Very similar to Downton Abbey and the Crown, but unlike those it is suitable for younger audiences. My daughter, who was nine at this time that Victoria first aired, wanted to watch the show due to her obsession with the lead actress (Jenna Coleman) who was her favorite companion in Doctor Who. Victoria, being another BBC show, met up to all of our expectations. We recently have been re-watching the series with our daughter who is now thirteen. There are many things you miss when you watch it the first time. So it is so refreshing to have a new perspective on it. Season one is a little hard to get into, but you have to understand what Victoria, was going through and the pressure that was on her. Her Uncle William IV died when she was eighteen, leaving her to the crown at a very young age. She is stubborn at first, due to finally being able to have a little freedom from her controlling mother and governess , but she matures greatly as she finds new mentors and people to guide her during the beginning of her journey. Season 1: There is no visible sex throughout the show, only a couple passionate kisses between Victoria and Albert, where you can assume what happens next, but younger audiences will not even think twice. These kisses however, are so meaningful to the two of them, the first being after the two were married. The two are truly in love, and these special moments last less than fifteen seconds. There is an episode before Albert and Victoria are wed, where Albert's less than mature brother takes him to a brothel. But, this scene is also very special to the oncoming seasons, because rather than wasting himself before being married, Albert talks to the woman he is with and learns about being a good husband. Alberts aforementioned brother Ernest, is in love with a married woman who is serving on the Queen's court. They spend much time together, but he is respectful and does not interact with her as more than friends until the third season. Season 2: The kissing scenes are the same, nothing ever progressing on camera, and most are playful. There is an episode where the court goes to France. The crown prince, his brother, and their private secretaries all go skinny dipping in a waterfall, where two of their backsides are seen while jumping in. (It's very quick, if you blink, you miss it.) This doesn't last a long time and nothing is sexualized, they were just having a bit of fun. There was also a same sex kiss with two of the side characters, but like all the others, it was not sexualized but rather special, and short. You do not have to worry about this relationship in the future however because (SPOILERS) one of the two gets shot in the next episode. Season 3: Everything is the same as the first two, nothing is too intense for young audiences. One of the women who previously served on the queen's court does eventually let the prince's brother, Albert, kiss her and she shows up to his bedroom months after her husband died. The two kiss for a few seconds but due to Ernest's skin disease he stops it and nothing progresses. There is a scene where Albert buys a painting for Victoria, and it is a nude couple. There is some topless nudity, but it is only a painting and its an easy scene to skip. Watching one of Britain's greatest monarchs grow and mature as the seasons progress is such a beautiful thing. It shows how politics worked back then, and it has interested me to learn more about these topics. It's wonderfully accurate and so much fun to learn further into the subjects, or learning about how some of the actors prepared for these roles. There are so many incredible things about this show, for example: The costumes are hand made, inspired by the paintings that have been done and the sketches that they've recovered. Much of it is historically accurate, there are some side stories that aren't likely but that is just for dramatic effect. The sets are extremely detailed, the palace's interior was constructed inside an airplane hangar, which after seeing the show is quite unbelievable. There are many behind the scenes videos on YouTube which are very entertaining now that I've seen the show twice. All of the actors are incredible and Ms. Jenna Coleman portrays the character of Victoria better than I could have imagined. I recommend this show to anyone I can. The Crown and Victoria did come out around the same time, so this could be why there's a lack of popularity with period fanatics. I encourage you to watch this with you and your children or your spouse, it's rare to have a show this pure to be as pure as it is.

This title has:

Great role models
age 18+

This is not for children; adult conversation & activity

This show has a decent storyline and characters but as I was thinking of recommending this to my mother in mid-season 1, I searched on here and..... A user left a review that was incredibly helpful. The only reason I batted an eye at this show is because it’s rating. My family and I live a structured lifestyle that is centered around God Most-High/His values and we take it serious to refrain from indecent practices which also includes exposing ourselves to indecent TV as well. So, because of someone telling me the TRUTH on here about some of the sexually explicit content, whether mild or worse, I am grateful because even though I am to avoid that type of tv exposure, we also DO NOT -WANT- to see people have sex (even acting) or anything similar. It’s unnecessary. So thank you for your honest reviews & not only considering people like me, but parents also (I one too) who take it serious to raise their kids without being unnecessarily exposed to the increasing filth on tv. TV doesn’t have to show graphic scenes for us to understand what is going on. May Peace be unto You & God Bless.

This title has:

Too much sex
Too much drinking/drugs/smoking
age 16+

We love the show, though sides characters aren't as pure

We really enjoy this show. We appreciate how clean it is in the sense that there isn't private parts shown. But I would have to rate each season differently. I think 13/14 year olds could watch most of the 1 season, then 15/16 year olds for 2nd season, and then older for the 3rd season. There is no language really, but there is a few moments of sexual theme talk, fairly pg-13. The brother of the prince is a playboy and we are aware of his activities, there are also a few couples we are unhappy and publicly aren't faithful, there is also in season 3 a more graphic sex scene between and a servant and lady in waiting. That was a little uncomfortable because they don't pan away to insinuate, the camera stays as dress in being hicked up, thrusting is seen, we fast forwarded in and the after scene they are all really sweaty and heavy breathing. Season 3 kind of goes a little down hill with over drama and sexual issues. Again, no private parts shown, but there is just enough sexual drama, either with talking, joking, or scenes that I wouldn't let my younger teens watch it. Maybe an 16 year olds, but I'm still unsure. But there are a lot of characters that you like and to see a marriage where people are in love, but have struggles is kind of nice. We like a lot of the people on the show and enjoy it as adults, but I wouldn't say kid show.
age 12+

Dull and uninteresting

It is a dreary soap Opera. As I Google facts and characters I find great disparity between what I see in this Series and what I read on Wikipedia. The idea that a Duchess could have an affair with a rather homely Footman is ridiculous. There a just so many questionable facts in the Series.
age 13+
Victoria is marvelous show to continue to pursue watching. In Season 1, Victoria grows up from being a naive child and takes the power of Queen. The great messages are surrounding the story on how Queen Victoria asks and truly listens to her hairdresser's views on Victoria's current situations politically and socially. In Season 2, Victoria allows her hairdresser to bring in a poor person to be able to understand the situation of her people. Throughout the whole two seasons Queen Victoria does everything for her people. Victoria comes off judgmental and self-centered because she cannot trust anyone due to the fact many nobles are trying to kill her and take over for her. In reality, Victoria is bright intellectually due to the way she tests every noble, worker, slaves, family relation, and possible ladies in waiting. Victoria even ends up adding more pay than originally to her slaves in her household, due to her hairdresser mentioning not making enough to live, that is definitely not self-centered. Victoria's hairdresser continued to share with Victoria extended things that the slaves did; for example, the slaves sold Victoria's old non-worn gloves and lace garment. Victoria was not self-centered and mad, she really did not care and encouraged them to continue. Victoria even gave one of her lace garments to the hairdresser when the hairdresser had to sell hers to help her and her friend pay for food and boarding. Victoria learned that her hairdresser needs the money, in order to help her Victoria gives a bunch to her, to sell at that time.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models
age 11+

Entertaining and educational

This show is very well done. It remains a fun to watch drama without being overboard. It could also teach kids about queen Victoria, even if some of it is fictional. This is one of my favorite shows and I highly recommend it. The review should not have compared it to Downtown Abby; they are both great shows in their own way. Definitely a show worth watching.

This title has:

Great role models
age 12+

At last a family-friendly historical drama in the 2010s! - updated review 2019

I am so sick and tired of virtually every historical drama being top-loaded with extreme sex and violence (The Tudors, Outlander, The White Queen, etc.) And I approached Victoria with a similar concern, especially given advance press in 2016 suggested it was going to be another sex-filled potboiler. As a huge fan of Jenna Coleman from Doctor Who I was going to try and watch the show anyway, but I was prepared to walk away as I've had to walk away from so many other current shows. But I was VERY pleasantly surprised to discover that Victoria is not only an intelligent series that touches on adult topics, but it does so in such a way that appeals to (nearly) all ages. I say nearly because there is some somewhat frank discussion about sex and contraception - but beyond passionate kissing there's no sexual content or nudity (at one point Victoria even takes a bath fully clothed!). The performances are excellent, with Jenna Coleman giving an award-worthy portrayal of the Queen and Rufus Sewell is equally good as Lord Melbourne, whose relationship with Victoria is pushed a bit further into romance in this series than in real life - but if you read the diaries and biographies, you'll find it's not completely fictional. Tom Hughes as Prince Albert makes a bit less of an impact and doesn't really grow into the part until near the end of the first season (as opposed to Jenna and Rufus who hit the ground running). The show also features a look at the lives some of the servants and assistants who rarely encountered the Queen directly. Their stories take a while to build and, together with Albert not really getting going till near the end, is why I initially docked this a star. So is there any content to be worried about for families? There is a very funny sequence regarding a poorly thought-out contraception method that may raise an awkward question; there is some minor violence, the worst being a slightly bloody injury to a dog; and only one moderate religious curse word. That's it. The version airing on PBS contains about 5-7 minutes per episode extra than the version that aired in the UK, but nothing objectionable has been added (the DVD/Blu-ray has the original UK version). People keep wanting to compare this show to Downton Abbey, but they shouldn't. It's not Downton, nor does it try to be. This is the story of a Queen. If anything, it should be viewed as a slightly more family-friendly prequel to The Crown. It's definitely worth your time. Series 2 update (October 2017): The second series delivered more of the same as Series 1, indicating the makers followed the adage "if it ain't broke..." That said, Series 2 does include a few more mature themes - postpartum depression is a big one, and there discussions around mortality as Albert loses a close relative, while two others close to Victoria's heart also take their leave, one of whom may be quite distressing to younger viewers as we briefly see his lifeless form. A same-sex relationship (not supported by history) is introduced which may be a concern to some, but beyond a couple of kisses the series shows the same admirable restraint as it always has, and the relationship is well-handled, as is a subplot that follows a supporting character has he undergoes 19th century treatment for an STD. There is a little bit of minor rear male nudity in one episode in a non-sexual context as we see - from a distance - several male characters skinny-dipping, but I doubt the scene shows enough to even be censored on network TV. There is also a very brief sequence showing someone having sex, but it makes sense in context, there is no nudity or even much by way of movement and it's handled in such a way that it didn't trip any of my alarms. One aspect of Series 2 that has troubled some is that more liberties are taken with regards to certain historical events, and Victoria's attitudes are shown to be more heroic in the show than in real life; this is actually a very good series for teaching younger viewers about how dramatizations are not documentaries, while perhaps also inspiring them to do their own research about Victoria and forming their own judgements about the woman and her time. In all, I greatly enjoyed the second season and I recommend it as highly as the first; in fact, I think it was a better season overall, and as a result I have increased my star rating to 5 stars. Update #2 (January 2018): Be warned there is a love scene in the Christmas special that is a bit raunchier than you might be used to, but it makes sense in context and doesn't go any further than some heavy kissing; I doubt it would push the show out of PG if it was a movie. Oh, and the aforementioned bare backsides were actually blurred in the PBS version of the episode, but be aware the DVD doesn't do so - but again it's very minor. Victoria continues to be an oasis (even The Crown went more R-rated in series 2 with increased sexual content). Long may she reign. Update 2019: Series 3 is slightly edgier than the previous two, mainly because it focuses more on the tensions between Albert and Victoria as their marriage hits a rough patch following her 6th and 7th children. New subplots include a dashing, rogue-like character who is depicted as sleeping around - something his wife actually approves of, and another romance takes place between two others in the palace that includes some heavy breathing and post-sex moments. Still, very unlikely to push the show out of PG, though the PBS airing - which occurred this time before the UK broadcast - was censored; a bit of rear male nudity and a possible strong curse word. All that into account, the show is still very mild compared to other royalty-based productions like the Mary Queen of Scots film.

This title has:

Great messages
Great role models