We Bare Bears

TV review by
Emily Ashby, Common Sense Media
We Bare Bears TV Poster Image
Hilarious bear bros. try to fit into tech-heavy human world.
 Popular with kidsParents recommend

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 17 reviews

Kids say

age 7+
Based on 37 reviews

We think this TV show stands out for:

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value

The show intends to entertain rather than educate. 

Positive Messages

The show pokes gentle fun at some stereotypes of today's culture, such as people's dependence on smartphones. As the bears attempt to assimilate, viewers see humans' habits through outsiders' eyes, often with comical results. There's a genuine camaraderie and teamwork among the characters, which, along with their occasional bickering, mimics sibling relationships. The importance of being yourself and appreciating others is a recurring theme. 

Positive Role Models & Representations

The bears are comfortable with who they are and remain true to themselves and their bond even while they strive to fit in among their human neighbors. 

Violence & Scariness

Some bumps and falls, but nothing that causes lasting injury. 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that We Bare Bears is a funny and heartwarming story about three brothers of the bear persuasion who lean on each other as they try to fit in among the human population. Their attempts sometimes poke gentle fun at hallmarks of modern society (reliance on technology, Internet memes, and the like) and usually result in some sort of chaos brought on by the bears' utter unsuitability for the people world. Even so, what stands out is how the characters' uniqueness serves them well as a group and how they're reminded time and again that they're stronger as a group than they are individually. The show's content is fine for kids, but teens and adults might have a better understanding of the humor, since it relates to the stereotypes it raises about our technologically driven society. 

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Adult Written byKanemori August 21, 2015

Can it be?

I had absolutely given up on watching Cartoon Network altogether but then I saw this show. You can tell that it was skillfully animated. the characters don... Continue reading
Adult Written byBan Moy July 31, 2015

I smell a hit!

Hilarious and fun new show from Cartoon Network. Off For 4 and under, Pause for ages 5-6, On for 7+
Teen, 16 years old Written byawesome rainbow August 1, 2015

Original cartoon has heart, humor, and brotherhood

I LOVE THIS SHOW! I saw it and I immediatly fell in love with it. It is a great family cartoon and lacks the fart, poop, or barf jokes. The story takes place i... Continue reading
Teen, 14 years old Written byladybuglooove September 3, 2015

cute and funny!

i'm not deeply into this show, but it can be fun to watch. definitely appropriate for children and the bears are awesome.

What's the story?

WE BARE BEARS follows brothers Grizzly (voiced by Eric Edelstein), Panda (Bobby Moynihan), and Ice Bear (Demetri Martin) as they attempt to assimilate into the people world in the San Francisco area. Following the lead of those they see around them, they spend their time snapping selfies, creating viral videos, and even testing the entrepreneurial waters with a food truck business of their own. But even with the help of their lone human friend, Chloe (Charlyne Yi), the bears find that there's more to being hip than just doing what the next guy does, and they have a lot to learn about blending into the masses.

Is it any good?

This cartoon is rich in its simplicity, both visually and with respect to the endearing characters' actions, follies, and lessons learned. With every hilarious mishap that comes from the brothers' attempts to be something they're not (and there are many), they're reminded of the value of being themselves. It's a good thing, too, because try as they might, they never quite manage to get the whole human thing right.

Much credit is due to We Bare Bears' talented voice cast, who assign comically distinct personalities to the bears. There's the ever-optimistic oldest brother, Grizz; chronically insecure Panda; and Ice, whose über-chill demeanor is a good match for his name. A simple plot and basic animation style lay the groundwork for this likable series, but it's the voices that give the bears real pizzazz.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the ups and downs of being a sibling. Kids: Do you usually get along with your brother(s) and/or sister(s)? What kinds of things do you enjoy doing together? What are the more difficult aspects of having siblings? How do the siblings on We Bare Bears get along?

  • Why do the bears want to be part of a society that's not their natural one? How does it feel to be excluded from something? Why is it important to be mindful in including others in what you're doing?

  • This show implies that it's simple to generalize about today's society and its population. Are people as easy to stereotype as this? Is it offensive to make this kind of statement about "everyone"? Does the fact that it's made in jest change how it's received? 

  • How do the characters on We Bare Bears demonstrate teamwork? Why is this an important character strength?

TV details

Character Strengths

Find more TV shows that help kids build character.

Themes & Topics

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