Wedding Wars

TV review by
Melissa Camacho, Common Sense Media
Wedding Wars TV Poster Image
Survivor-like wedding contest is far from romantic.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 14+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Positive Messages

The series focuses on the material aspects of a wedding rather than the importance of the relationship between the couples or what constitutes marriage. It also encourages the nastier side of competition.

Positive Role Models & Representations

While some couples work well with each other under difficult circumstances, many of the couples exhibit sneaky and unsportsman-like behavior.

Violence

The cast is constantly reminded that they're at war with each other, but despite some yelling, screaming, and cat fighting, the actual violence is rather minimal. Cast members occasionally get mildly injured during challenges.

Sex

Hugging and kissing are occasionally visible. Issues like abstaining before marriage are briefly discussed. Quick references to various sexual behaviors. 

Language

Words like “hell,” “ass,” and “bitch” are audible; curses like “bulls--t” and “f--k” are bleeped.

Consumerism

The Turtle Bay Resort in Oahu, Hawaii, is prominently featured. Show sponsors include Mori Lee and Jim’s Formal Wear. Cast members occasionally sport outfits with brand logos like Chanel.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

Champagne drinking is occasionally visible. Camp supplies include red and white wine. Cast members’ romantic histories sometimes include drunken encounters.

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this reality elimination series -- featuring couples exiled to a remote island to compete for a dream destination wedding -- includes lots of sneaky behavior, catty arguments, and sexual references. Cursing is frequent (the strongest words are bleeped) and wine and champagne drinking is visible. Turtle Bay Resort in Hawaii and additional wedding-related brands and products are also prominently featured.

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Kid, 9 years old March 17, 2011

Bad.

Not good.

What's the story?

In WEDDING WARS, soon-to-be brides and grooms are pitted against each other for a dream destination wedding and a cash prize worth over $100,000. Twelve engaged couples are exiled to a remote Pacific island with little food, water, or shelter; there they participate in challenges for prizes designed to help them with their wedding preparations. They also compete for a coveted cake topper, which keeps them safe from elimination. Each week the weakest (or most disliked) couple gets voted off; the last couple remaining wins the grand prize.

Is it any good?

Wedding Wars combines the rugged competitiveness and scheming behavior of Survivor with all of the drama that comes along with wedding planning. But much of the show’s entertainment value comes from watching the couples’ relationships being tested as they cope with the pressures of the contest.

The show’s focus is on the materialism surrounding a wedding, rather than strengthening the marital relationship or thinking about the long-term commitment that the couples are planning to make. And, like most reality competitions, the series features plenty of arguing, cursing, and drinking. Viewers who like this sort of thing might find it entertaining, but it definitely lacks romance.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about weddings. What are the costs involved in throwing a wedding? Do they have to be expensive to be nice? What kinds of messages does the media send about what a wedding should look like and/or cost?

  • Do you think competing for things for a wedding makes it less romantic? Why or why not?

  • What do you think about competition? Is there a good and bad way to

  • compete? What kind of competitors are on this show? How do TV shows like

  • this influence people's ideas about how to compete well?

TV details

For kids who love romance and reality

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