WildWoods

TV review by
Jenny Nixon, Common Sense Media
WildWoods TV Poster Image
Pals have silly adventures in mellow, outdoorsy kid show.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this TV show.

Educational Value
Positive Messages

Episodes often have positive messages, such as "working together helps everyone" and "everyone is different and that's OK." 

Positive Role Models & Representations

Poppy can be overly bossy and distrustful, sometimes lies to take advantage of Cooper's inexperience and trusting nature. Cooper means well but tends to believe everyone thinks like him, so he can ignore Poppy's feelings. 

Violence & Scariness

A story centers on Poppy's fear that Cooper has eaten their snail friend, Frederick. Poppy and Cooper find giant footprints and random balls of fur and suspect there is a monster on the loose in the woods (spoiler alert: It's just Cooper).

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that WildWoods is a very mellow kids' show starring a dopey Sasquatch (an actor in a furry suit), an overly anxious sugar glider (a puppet), and a silent snail ("played" by a live snail) who live in a lush, green forest. The woodsy setting and the characters' silly adventures are meant to encourage kids to take a break from screen time and connect with the outdoors. The show's messages are simple and positive enough -- characters learn how to cooperate with each other and how to be a good sport -- but the dialogue and songs can be repetitive. Nature-loving kids who don't mind a slow pace may be the best audience for this mild-to-the-max series.

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What's the story?

WILDWOODS tells the story of Cooper, a gigantic, guitar-playing Sasquatch who clomps his way out of the big city he used to call home and into the forest, where he comes across a high-strung but ultimately friendly little sugar glider named Poppy. Poppy and her pal Frederick the snail help their new neighbor adjust to the quiet life among the trees. Together they make art, sing songs, play games, and learn how to get along despite their differences.

Is it any good?

The gorgeously verdant backdrops -- the show is filmed in scenic locations across Ireland -- are the best thing about this nearly-too-mild show. The aim of WildWoods is purportedly to encourage kids to "disconnect from digital devices and reconnect with nature," but it requires more than beautiful backgrounds to drive this point home. Part of the problem is how few characters there are: just three, and one of them (the snail) is silent. Poppy, a tiny sugar glider, is pretty apprehensive when she meets Cooper the Sasquatch, and her cocky and often dismissive attitude toward him extends beyond this initial meeting, though they eventually share some sweet moments. Cooper is a newbie in the woods, and makes some understandable mistakes as a result, but he can also be willfully ignorant, as when he drags Poppy around all day in the rain because he loves it, despite her repeated protestations about how unhappy it's making her. 

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about why Cooper chooses to move from the big city to a place as remote and unfamiliar to him as the woods in WildWoods. What does it feel like to be in a new environment? What are some ways you can get acclimated to a place you're not used to?

  • Poppy is initially fearful of Cooper due to his outlandish size. How do these strangers develop more trust over time, and learn to work together? Why is teamwork an important character strength?

TV details

For kids who love gentle TV

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