LMK.GirlScouts.org

Website review by
Susan Yudt, Common Sense Media
LMK.GirlScouts.org Website Poster Image
Sensible Internet safety guide from the Girl Scouts.

Parents say

age 9+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this website.

Positive Messages

Encourages responsible and respectful behavior online.

Violence
Sex
Language
Consumerism

The companion site for parents includes information on Windows products and links to its Web site.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that this interactive site -- a partnership between the Girl Scouts and Microsoft -- provides helpful information for teens (and parents) about Internet safety issues.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say
Parent of a 12 year old Written bytealsweety July 16, 2009

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's it about?

A partnership between the Girl Scouts of the USA and Microsoft, LMK.GIRLSCOUTS.ORG tackles a topic on many teens' minds: keeping the Internet a fun, friendly space. Along with Internet safety expert Parry Aftab, the site's teen editors -- Girl Scouts from across the country -- offer stories, statistics, tips, and quizzes on cyberbullying, social networking, and online predators, with more subjects coming soon. The project also includes a companion site for parents.

Is it any good?

LMK (cyber-speak for "let me know") takes a refreshingly common-sense approach to online safety: Be savvy -- not scared -- and teach your friends what you've learned. The information provided is smart and thorough (though sometimes a bit redundant), and teens should appreciate hearing what their peers have to say on the subject. Editorially, the site is a little rough around the edges, but it's off to a good start.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the safety issues discussed on this site. Have your kids or their friends ever been cyberbullied? What steps do they take to protect their privacy on social networking sites? Parents can encourage teens to come talk to them or another

  • trusted adult if they're ever feeling uncomfortable or threatened online.

Website details

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate