Big Big Baller

App review by
Chris Morris, Common Sense Media
Big Big Baller App Poster Image
Charming, fun genre-defying game appeals to all ages.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

Game mechanics are easy to learn. Winning the game is really more a matter of who your online opponents are. 

Violence & Scariness

You'll run your ball over people and try to squash opponents, but there's no gore. 

Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Expect to watch a LOT of video ads in between rounds or if you want to boost your coin coffers for the game.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Big Big Baller is a multiplayer adventure game for iOS and Android devices. Players attempt to increase the size of their on-screen orbs and defeat other players. It's a charming concept that borrows heavily from the Katamari Damacy games but focuses on multiplayer gameplay. The violence is notable only because you roll over a town's citizens, but no blood or gore is shown. There's no sex, drugs, drinking, or objectionable language. But there are a lot of video ads, which play between rounds and force you to watch them for notable periods. Read the developer's privacy policy for details on how your (or your kids') information is collected, used, and shared and any choices you may have in the matter, and note that privacy policies and terms of service frequently change.

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What's it about?

In BIG BIG BALLER, players compete against each other to build the biggest ball they can in a short period of time. While everyone starts the same size, players increase the size of their ball by rolling it around a city, squashing items smaller than them to add to their size. By the later stage of the game, players can consume skyscrapers and stadiums. The biggest ball wins the round. A Battle Royale mode pits players more directly against each other, with bigger balls attempting to squash smaller ones. 

Is it any good?

Sometimes the simplest ideas make for the most fun experiences, like this clever puzzle game. Big Big Baller takes the core game mechanic of Katamari Damacy (roll over stuff with a ball and make it as big as possible) and adds a friendly competitive element to it. The result is a family-friendly, insanely addictive multiplayer game. There's no interaction between players aside from the game itself, so parents don't need to worry about inappropriate contact. Plus, the game rounds are short, so it's easy to find a break point. And the game offers a mode where squashing other players isn't the point of the game. 

About the only downside to Big Big Baller is the frequency and mandatory nature of the video ads. They're distracting and take you out of the happy place you'll be in while you're in the midst of playing the game. There's no real way around this, making it a necessary evil. Fortunately, it's not enough to detract from Big Big Baller's strengths. If you're looking for a friendly puzzler, check this game out.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about creativity in game design. How is the creative gameplay in Big Big Baller different from that of other apps you play? 

  • Is it best to challenge other players as soon as possible or wait until you've gathered your strength to give yourself a chance to succeed?

App details

  • Devices: iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android
  • Price: Free
  • Pricing structure: Free
  • Release date: September 26, 2018
  • Category: Adventure Games
  • Size: 206.70 MB
  • Publisher: Lion Studios
  • Version: 1.1.0
  • Minimum software requirements: Requires iOS 8.0 or later; Requires Android 4.1 and up

For kids who love puzzles

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