Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood: Play at Home with Daniel

App review by
Cynthia Chiong, Common Sense Media
Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood: Play at Home with Daniel App Poster Image
Simple game gets kids talking about everyday activities.

Parents say

age 13+
Based on 1 review

Kids say

age 18+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can learn about bedtime and bathroom routines and about going to the doctor. For the first two, kids can think about how they like to go to bed or what they do in the bathroom. Do they like to sleep with a night light on? Do they remember to flush? While these two activities are more exploratory, the doctor activity offers a bit more content. It shows kids some common doctor's tools and briefly explains what they do in kid-friendly terms. Even so, the activities lean on parents to continue the conversation. Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is a fun starting point for parents to teach their kids about common topics.

Ease of Play

Overall, the activities are intuitive to use. The app is meant for exploratory play, so it does not give much instruction. The interactive elements can overlap and interrupt each other, so parents may need to help tap-happy kids be more patient.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Daniel Tiger a part of a commercial franchise.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is a cute, exploratory game where kids can do a little pretend playing. It features the title character from the PBS Kids TV show. They can pretend to be a doctor, pretend they are putting Daniel Tiger to bed, or help him with his bathroom routine. It's a nice opportunity for parents to talk about some everyday routines and also about unfamiliar or unpleasant places like the doctor's office. There's also a sticker book to play with. Read the developer's privacy policy for details on how your (or your kids') information is collected, used, and shared and any choices you may have in the matter, and note that privacy policies and terms of service frequently change.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

Teen, 13 years old Written byCupcakeRocker July 25, 2016

Seriously?

This app sucks. As a birthday gift, I bought it for my little sister's birthday. She played it for 1 day and then was bored. She did the doctor activities... Continue reading

What's it about?

In Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood, kids can play three different scenarios: bedtime, bathroom, and doctor; there's also a sticker book activity. In the three scenarios, kids can pretend to be a doctor by giving Daniel a shot or pretend they're putting Daniel to sleep and tuck him in. Kids are free to explore the interactive elements, which are all fairly realistic (i.e. you can tap on the light switch to turn it off). The sticker book activity is a cute just-for-fun feature where kids can fill four different backgrounds with tons of stickers.

Is it any good?

Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is a simple app that covers some basic topics appropriate for young kids. It's best as a shared activity, so parents can guide their kids through the brief activities and relate them back to everyday life. Otherwise, there's not too much going on with the activities themselves, and kids may lose interest if all they want to do is see what the interactive elements are.

When used together, the app can be a good conversation starter for parents to help kids understand their own routines and experiences, and also a good launching point for some old-fashioned pretend play. Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood is designed to empower parents and kids to create their own experience.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Play Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood with your kids and go over their own routines.

  • Talk about other routines kids might have or other unfamiliar places, like getting ready for school.

  • Make up some scenarios and role play.

App details

For kids who love apps for preschoolers

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