Doc McStuffins: Moving with Doc

App review by
Amanda Bindel, Common Sense Media
Doc McStuffins: Moving with Doc App Poster Image
Bulky, slow app teaches fitness and healthy habits.

Parents say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

Kids say

No reviews yetAdd your rating

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can learn to take care of their health with inspiration and tips from Doc McStuffins and her pals. They'll learn about "go" foods -- like fruits, vegetables, and fish -- and "slow" foods -- like French fries and candy. They'll also practice some backyard games with their fine motor skills (in the app) that they can replicate outside to develop their own gross motor skills and develop active, healthy habits. Moving with Doc is a cute way to inspire kids to move, but the ideas behind the game will only work if kids put down the iPad and go outside.

Ease of Play

The app responds slowly; some gestures don't respond quickly enough to complete the tasks. 

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Links to purchase other Disney apps are accessible in the passcode-protected parent section.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Doc McStuffins: Moving with Doc features characters from the Disney Junior television show Doc McStuffins participating in the "Big Backyard Games." They encourage kids to eat good foods, stretch, and move their bodies; demonstrate activities that might inspire kids to get active; and offer encouragement for kids to do their best by making healthy choices. It's a large download -- at more than 400MB -- and moves slowly between activities, which can be frustrating for kids.

User Reviews

  • Parents say
  • Kids say

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title.

What's it about?

Kids can choose to "train" or "compete" in the Backyard Games. They can choose their character from Lambie, Stuffy, and Hallie. In Training mode, kids chose from Food Catch, Stretch, Obstacle Course, Jump Rope, and Rings. They'll catch the "go" foods and avoid the slow foods in Food Catch, learning which foods give their body energy. In Stretch, kids have the option to use the camera to watch themselves doing stretches. They dodge or jump over bubbles in the Obstacle Course game, jump rope in the Jump Rope game, and swing on monkey bar rings in Rings, earning a star each time they complete an activity. Then kids can compete against a timer to complete the activities. They can also reward themselves with stickers on their Healthy Me Chart for activities they complete on their own outside the app, and they can take pictures of themselves to add to their chart.

Is it any good?

If kids can wait patiently for each game to load, they'll have some fun working through the activities and get inspired to go outside and play those same activities themselves. Some moves don't respond quickly to gestures, which is also frustrating. The overall message is great -- teaching kids to choose healthy foods to fuel their bodies and encouraging them to be active, and it's great that the games are all activities kids can re-create themselves outside. The concepts of adding their own pictures to the Healthy Me Chart and of seeing themselves stretching are really neat and personalize the game experience for kids. In a likely scenario, kids will play with the app a bit, get frustrated with the slow transitions, and ideally take their new ideas and go play outside.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Encourage kids to get outside to try out some of the activities from the app.

  • Create a mini obstacle course at home and time yourself and the kids running through it. Try to beat your individual best time.

  • Have kids pack their own lunches, choosing "go" foods.

App details

Themes & Topics

Browse titles with similar subject matter.

For kids who love learning with apps

Our editors recommend

Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate

About these links

Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Read more

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.

Learn how we rate