Look In My Eyes 1 Restaurant

App review by
Dana Anderson, Common Sense Media
Look In My Eyes 1 Restaurant App Poster Image
Game rewards eye contact; better for kids who like sims.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 4+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can learn the interpersonal skill of looking people in the eye, which can help them develop friendships and self-awareness. Kids can gain cultural awareness on the importance of eye contact, although it would be nice to see more diversity in the faces that appear on the app. In addition to eye contact, kids get some practice in number recognition and addition and subtraction by earning $2 in game currency for each correct response and spending that money on their virtual restaurant. Look In My Eyes 1 Restaurant can help kids practice making eye contact, but it's unclear whether on-screen practice will translate to real life.

Ease of Play

Very easy to play. Kids simply tap on the box showing the number that matches a number superimposed on the eyes of faces on the screen. They earn $2 in virtual money for each correct answer, and they can spend it to decorate and stock a virtual restaurant. Kids click on "Buy It" to purchase items for the restaurant from the Warehouse. They can tap "+" or "-" icons to make the objects larger or smaller and can drag them with a finger to assemble the restaurant.

Violence & Scariness
Sexy Stuff
Language
Consumerism

Kids earn $2 in game currency for every correct round of gameplay, and then they can "spend" the money on items for their virtual restaurant.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Look In My Eyes 1 Restaurant can help kids practice eye contact, an important social skill that many children with autism -– especially those with Asperger syndrome -– find challenging. Faces with different expressions (smiling, worried, friendly, sad) appear on the app's screen, and then a number flashes in the eyes for a couple of seconds. Kids have to look at the eyes until they see the number, remember the number they saw, and tap to choose the number from a set of answer choices.

User Reviews

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Kid, 12 years old March 8, 2013

Look Into My Eyes 1 Restaurant

This application looks like it could help a lot of kids since it teaches eye conatct in a fun way.

What's it about?

A face appears on the screen, and a number flashes in the eyes. Kids tap on the box containing the number that matches the number shown on the eyes. Kids earn $2 of virtual money for each correct answer, which they can spend on decorating and stocking a virtual restaurant. Kids can move from room to room around their restaurant (kitchen, patio, dining room, warehouse, cellar). They can tap the "+" or "-" icons to make the objects in their restaurant larger or smaller and can drag them to a new location with a finger.

Is it any good?

LOOK IN MY EYES 1 RESTAURANT is one of those apps that will likely work well for some kids, but others may not relate to it at all. The concept is simple and seems like it would be effective, but it depends on how kids take to the game and whether they enjoy the rewards. For kids who like the app, the learning value will come with consistent practice both on and off screen. For kids who don't connect to the game, perhaps a different version of the app would catch their interest (other versions include dinosaurs, undersea, steam train, mechanic, and more).

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Remind your kids of their progress in the app when preparing for a situation that requires eye contact.

  • Encourage your kids to make eye contact by placing yourself in their line of sight. Kneel down so it's easy for your kids to look at you.

  • Praise your kids' attempts at eye contact, whether they are successful or not.

App details

For kids who love simulation games and making friends

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