Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited

App review by
David Chapman, Common Sense Media
Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited App Poster Image
Fast, fun web-slinging action has heavy pay-to-play feature.

Parents say

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Kids say

age 7+
Based on 1 review

A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Ease of Play

Gameplay is all about timing, knowing when and which direction to swipe. It quickly builds in speed and obstacles, though, eventually calling for near lightning-fast reflexes to achieve high scores or advanced milestones.

Violence

Players dodge variety of obstacles and attacks from enemies. Plenty of punching, kicking, even shooting, but defeated enemies simply disappear from the screen, no blood or gore shown. Comic book visuals limit impact of violence.

Sex

A small number of available characters are shown in revealing costumes.

Language
Consumerism

Based on Marvel's popular Spider-Man franchise, with most characters, plot ideas pulled from the pages of various comic books. Though free-to-play, it pushes hard for players to spend real money for new virtual content or to watch ads to earn extra continues or other in-game items.

Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited is an endless-runner action game available for download on iOS and Android devices. Players take on the role of Marvel's web-slinger or any of many other characters from the Spider-Man universe as they run, jump, dodge, and swing their way around obstacles, beating up bad guys along the way. The game features comic book-style combat, with nameless grunts getting knocked out of the way by players and super villains using their powers before getting pummeled. There's no blood or gore in the game, though, with the art style making the entire adventure look like it was pulled straight from the comics. Although the game is free to play and players can progress without spending any actual money, it constantly throws a multitude of special offers and advertisements at the player in order to get extra content, continues, and so forth. 

User Reviews

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  • Kids say

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Teen, 13 years old Written byPandaLogic September 17, 2018

It's Ok.

This game is really fun and personally easy for me. You can have a younger kid use it, all you do is throw things and push enemy's. It is also addictive, b... Continue reading

What's it about?

In MARVEL SPIDER-MAN UNLIMITED, players get the opportunity to suit up as everyone's favorite friendly neighborhood wall crawler. When dimensional rifts begin to open up throughout the city, Spidey is quick to swing into action. But this might be more than one web-slinger can handle, as strange new versions of familiar faces wreak havoc alongside classic villains. Luckily, the bad guys aren't the only ones coming through these portals, because alternate versions of Spider-Man and his allies also join the fray in a universe-spanning team-up of epic proportions. Run, jump, punch, and swing your way over rooftops, through buildings, and even occasionally in other realms as you and your Spider-verse team try to save the city and shut down these rifts once and for all.

Is it any good?

This fast-paced endless runner does a great job of capturing the feel of the comic books, but the heavy push for advertising should set off players' spidey senses. Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited brings the wall crawler's web-slinging heroics to mobile platforms and puts your reflexes to the test, tossing everything at Spidey short of a kitchen sink. Obstacles drop from the sky, lasers shoot in all directions, bad guys get rocket packs AND rocket launchers, and if you manage to survive all that, there's still a big, bad villain to face. That's all before starting the cycle over again, even faster and more dangerous than before. While that seems overwhelming, the game's controls are very fluid and easy to learn. Best of all, there's never a moment when you don't actually feel like your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man.

As good as Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited may be, the biggest thing to get your spider sense tingling is the ever-present push to buy something. The game is constantly throwing pop-ups in your face, pressuring you to buy some sort of insane bundle filled with random extras. When the game's not pushing you to spend money, it's nudging you to watch ads for other games to continue progress during a run, add tokens, etc. On the upside, you can choose to skip out on spending or watching and still make significant progress in the game, because it's fairly generous with dishing out content like extra characters. Some of those heroes require a lot more grinding and luck to get than others, but thanks to the range of content available, you're still likely to get a decent mix of both new and familiar characters to swing through the skyline with.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about violence in video games. How is the impact of the violence in Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited affected by the comic book-like visuals? Is the impact heightened because you're punching or kicking a lot of faceless henchmen on a regular basis?

  • What are the traits and skills that make comic book superheroes "heroic"? How do those traits translate to the real world and real-life heroes?

  • Is the "free-to-play" model of gaming really free? How do games like Marvel Spider-Man Unlimited encourage players to spend money? What other ways do these games generate money (ads, merchandising, etc.)?

App details

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