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Number Run

App review by
Christy Matte, Common Sense Media
Number Run App Poster Image
Math practice has promise but could be more fun.

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A lot or a little?

The parents' guide to what's in this app.

Educational Value

Kids can practice arithmetic at their level which can increase math fluency.

Ease of Play

A tutorial gets kids started. The rest is easy to follow, but answers require quick recall.

Violence & Scariness

The avatar throws something at enemies to get them out of the way.

Sexy Stuff
Language
Drinking, Drugs & Smoking

What parents need to know

Parents need to know that Number Run is a math drill game to help kids practice math facts. It's not an ideal choice for kids who are just learning math facts as they will need to recall the correct answer fairly quickly, especially for answers with multiple digits. There are only two avatar choices -- male and female, with no option for kids of color. A tutorial helps get kids started, but some reading ability is helpful for navigation and rules. Read the developer's privacy policy for details on how your (or your kids') information is collected, used, and shared and any choices you may have in the matter, and note that privacy policies and terms of service frequently change.

User Reviews

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What's it about?

NUMBER RUN draws kids in with a heist-themed comic strip. They're off to recover the treasure. Along the way, they'll "battle" monsters, jump over canyons, dodge obstacles, and more, all using basic math facts in an endless-runner, side-scroller game style. Kids use an on-screen number line to enter their answers by tapping the digits they want. Number Run has two modes: Journey and Training. Journey leads kids through a logical progression of facts from the simplest of addition, up through division. Training mode allows kids (or adults) to specify which  combination of skills to practice, such as multiplication with threes and fours. For kids who like a real challenge, there's an infinite mode where problems get increasingly difficult to solve and everything speeds up.There are some power ups and kids can earn coins that they can use to purchase different outfits for their avatar. There are no statistics available to help with tracking.

Is it any good?

This math practice app is a cute alternative to flash cards and boring number drills, but it doesn't add as much fun as it could. Number Run changes things up from other math drills in that there's a hint of adventure in the mix. Unfortunately, it doesn't deliver much on that promise. The obstacles feel repetitive and the adventure is minimal. Kids earn power-ups, but can't choose when/how to use them, and there's no strategy other than getting your math answers right. The training mode is helpful for kids who are practicing a specific set of skills and so kids aren't faced with drills that are beyond their education. As the game progresses to harder problems with two-digit answers, the time to answer before hitting an obstacle doesn't increase. This leads to increased pressure/stress to answer. There are also no statistics to track how kids progress over time. Number Run does drill kids and may inspire them to properly memorize their facts, but it could use a bit more polish of its own.

Talk to your kids about ...

  • Families can talk about the math in Number Run. Practice math facts while in the car, waiting in line, and running errands. Quick recall of math facts makes it easier to tackle future math skills.

  • Families can talk about learning with apps. Do you think this is a good app for learning? Why or why not? What can you learn? 

App details

For kids who love math practice apps

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